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17

The difference is that an adjective placed before a noun acts as an attribute and after a noun it acts as a modifier. There are some rules as to the position of the adjective, as follows: Demonstrative, posessive and indefinite adjectives and articles go before the noun. E.g., Mis tres amigas vienen a la fiesta or Este nivel de español es intermedio. ...


12

I will try to make a comprehensive answer on the subject. First of all, Guapa(o), Hermosa(o), Linda(o), Bonita(o), Bella(o) are all synonyms to some extent, so one can be used in the place of the other most of the time. Although some are more appropriate than others depending on context, read further. Second, let's define all of these terms according to ...


12

ísimo/ma is a Latin suffix that can be appended to some adjectives and adverbs to form their superlatives: malísimo, riquísimo. The rules governing the use of the ísimo suffix are the following: For adjectives ending in l, r, and z, simply add the suffix (changing the final z for a c): fácil, facilísimo. feroz, ferocísimo. popular, ...


11

Según el Diccionario panhispánico de dudas Su plural es sexis (→ plural, 1e): «Sus patrocinadores las instaron a utilizar en el uniforme de competición pantaloncitos más pequeños y sexis» (GmzBartlett Eva [Esp. 2002]).


10

It doesn't matter if you use "San" or "Santo". Edit: Diccionario Panhispánico de dudas says that "Santo" must be used with Domingo, Tomás, Tomé and Toribio. (Thanks Gonzalo Medina for pointing this out) The reason to prefer to use "Santo" is to avoid confusion in oral speech. Quoting a WordReference thread: Technically, any male saint, or "santo", ...


9

I think many people would use them interchangeably, but they are not exactly the same. Both are defined as "que tienen eficacia" (eficaz) and "que tiene eficiencia" (eficiente). Now, let's look at the meanings of eficiencia and eficacia: eficiencia. (Del lat. efficientĭa). 1. f. Capacidad de disponer de alguien o de algo para conseguir un efecto ...


8

Hay que tener cuidado en no confundir el adjetivo con el participio pasivo. En el ejemplo de las frituras (que es como se le denomina genéricamente a las cosas que han sido freídas) podemos construir una frase que contenga ambos elementos, haciendo uso de la oración dada en la pregunta original: El pollo está frito después de haber sido freído en ...


8

I would say: un par (two of something) unos pocos (a small number) un puñado (same as a handful, both literally and actually) For several, I think the context might affect the translation a big deal. You might use, for example, varios, which actually means just “more than one”, but is the right translation in many cases where several is used in English. ...


7

The changes you're referring to are strictly to maintain the desired sound. Example: Rico -> Riquísimo. The only reason the change is there is because the letter C is only "hard" before A, O, and U and other consonants. Before I and E, it produces a soft sound (like S, or more accurately like Z where the two letters have different sounds). In other ...


7

Es una pregunta difícil. Como ya se ha dicho, generalmente tanto "nice" como "good" se suelen traducir como "buena". No todos los idiomas tienen los mismos matices para las calificaciones y no todos los niveles tienen un equivalente exacto. Creo que "aceptable" se queda bastante por debajo de "nice", e incluso descalificaría a las respuestas que no llegaran ...


6

I wouldn't say that those words are exceptional; they're following the rules, but they also follow reality. If a man really did get pregnant (like in a certain movie), you'd just use embarazado (or preñado or encinto) and, while it'd catch people's attention, they'd follow you from the context. Some words only apply to one gender. You wouldn't call a woman ...


6

Actually Gonzalo's nice answer doesn't cover one part of the story fully. It's not that Spanish has two ways to express the superlative of adjectives - rather Spanish, like Latin, most modern Romance languages, and also Ancient Greek has two different kinds of superlatives: The relative superlative This is the more familiar one with más: El más grande It ...


6

Let's check what RAE says about this. In this link of RAE you can read 3.2. Adjetivo pospuesto a varios sustantivos. Cuando un adjetivo califica a dos o más sustantivos coordinados y va pospuesto a ellos, lo más recomendable es que el adjetivo vaya en plural y en masculino, si los sustantivos son de distinto género: «Tiene el pelo y la barba ...


6

Use "inteligente". No creo que esa sea una decisión muy inteligente. Sería inteligente llamar antes de ir. Fue una manera muy inteligente de gestionar la situación. Metaphorically, you can also use "sabio" applied to non humans, such as: No creo que esa sea una decisión muy sabia.


5

Español Esto se está refiriendo al hecho de terminar algo. Por ejemplo supón que una persona termina con sus tareas/actividades el podría decir: ¡Listo! Esto es como una version corta de: Esto está listo. Lo que quiere decir es que ya terminó de hacer algo. Por eso se dice listo sin importar si el interlocutor es hombre o mujer. Inglés This ...


4

There are many meanings with these words: Tímido and vergonzoso: their main difference could be that with vergonzoso you emphasize the fact the person you're talking about feels (or could feel) shame when doing something. With tímido you only say he/she will be more reluctant to behave in a more "direct" way, someone without "personality". Reservado: is ...


4

My quick take: Bonita: pretty Linda: pretty (commonly used in Latin America but not in Spain) Hermosa: beautiful bella: pretty (between bonita and hermosa) guapa: handsome (a handsome man can be called "guapo") It is really hard to advise which ones to use. It depends on too many things. Are you making a compliment or are you talking to your friends ...


4

This is a common way of speaking about spiciness poco/ligeramente picante- mild picante - medium muy picante - hot If something is not spicy or slightly spicy we would say it is "suave".


4

The current use in Spain is: acerca de is never used with this meaning; its only use is meaning about in an informal context, whenever you can choose between the adverb cerca and the adjective cercano/a, use the first in a more formal context or in writing, you can use either cerca or cercano/a So I wouldn't say Tenemos una casa cercana al aeropuerto, ...


3

Usado como "estar listo": Chica hablando: "(yo) estoy lista" Chico hablando: "(yo) estoy listo" Si omites "estar", este verbo puede tener como sujeto elípitico dos cosas: La persona que habla o la propia acción que se estuviera llevando a cabo. Siendo el sujeto la propia persona, es exactamente igual que como "estar listo", pero sin decir ...


3

Generally speaking, you cannot expect 1:1 mapping of words when you translate. Most of the times you'll translate schlimm to malo, sometimes maybe even malvado. In case of schlecht your translation will vary. Sometimes it will also be malo. In other cases, like for example in case of grading you can say "notas bajas", which I think is used more often than ...


3

There is no such distinction in the Spanish language, where to achieve the difference in concept present in German (gleich / selbst) you must use other means: Dealing with books you can state de difference between libro (the phisical copy) and obra (what is actually read at last): Leímos el mismo libro.  →  (possible ambiguity) Leímos ...


3

According to the RAE, pelón means someone who has little or no hair, and that it means "with a lot of hair" in Ecuador. A topic on Wordreference.com confirms this, so does looking the word up on Wordreference. So I think you can go on using pelón safely to say "bald or with little hair".


3

Alguno/s and Alguna/s (which usually means "some") can be: an adjective. E.g. Fueron algunas personas a la fiesta. a pronoun. E.g. ¿Fueron tus amigos a la fiesta? No todos, solo algunos. ("algunos" replaces "algunos amigos") But when they are used as an adjective sometimes you have to use the short form algún intead of alguno/alguna. These are the rules: ...


3

I think the spectrum is comparable with English: insuficiente - not enough / insufficient suficiente - enough / sufficient bastante - plenty demasiado - too much I usually hear 'bastante' used when implying more than 'enough'; although it's not exactly the same as 'plenty', it's pretty close in a lot of cases: Comí suficiente. "I ate enough" (ie, ...


3

That's not incorrect and actually you asked what you shuld have to. But people use to refer to "vaso de agua" as just "agua" e.g. ¿Me da un agua de sandía? Chica, por favor. (when a standard unit is understood: e.g. vaso or jarra) Imagine the lot of times a waitress deal with the expression vaso grande/chico de agua. It's totally correct, but just ...


3

La RAE indica alasqueño/a o alaskeño/a. Otras propuestas como alaskano, alaskiano, alaskense, alascense se pueden encontrar aquí, pero no son reconocidas por la RAE.


2

According to the RAE, bastante means "enough" or "quite a bit", like c4sh says in their answer. I've never seen it translated as too much: bastante. adj. Que basta. adv. c. Ni mucho ni poco, ni más ni menos de lo regular, ordinario o preciso; sin sobra ni falta. adv. c. No poco. Es bastante rico Bastante bella And these are all the ...


2

Enough (or just enough) "Ya he tenido bastante!" (I've had enough of this!). Maybe this is the meaning you confuse with "too much". Quite "Mi perro es bastante viejo" (My dog is quite old).


2

Guapa (or guapo). Is mostly used to say that somebody has a beautiful face. This is the most common word. It doesn't say anything about the rest of the body. Some young people could also use it to refer to cool situations or things but it's slang. Bonita (or bonito, not very common for man) is used both for people and objects. Beautiful. Sometimes is ...



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