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22

In spanish there is a rule for plurals of nouns that involve countries or organizations. That means that when the word is plural there must be a double initial or a repetition of itself. This means the following: Estados unidos = EEUU Now, EE = Estados, E = Estado (same with UU) E.E.U.U. is incorrect because it gives the interpretation that the ...


14

In SMS/chat slang: xq, xk, pq means "porque" or "por qué"; x means "por", because it looks like × (multiplication sign); q or k means "que"; xf means "por fa(vor)" qtl or ktl means "que tal"; qtpsa or ktpsa means "que te pasa"; = means "igual"; + means "mas" or "más"; - means "menos"; s means "es"; l means "el"; d means "de"; etc. Example: "ktl?" "+ o ...


14

It essentially means porque x is widely recognized as the multiplication sign. To say it one says por. x = Por and q is the abbreviation of que. Being just a q there are no words I can think of that are monosyllables and that start with q. So it is safe to assume it is que. q = que xq = porque


13

Usted is a descendent of medieval Spanish Vuestra Merced, meaning "your mercy". It was an expression used to address upper classes in feudal Spain and evolved to be the general form of respectful address in the language in the seventeenth century or later. The letters "u" and "v" — like the letters "i" and "j" — were written the same in Latin. The choice of ...


10

Lo que yo hago (otros harán otras cosas): Te hace gracia y te sonríes :) Te hace gracia y te ríes :D Una sonrisa perversa: jejejeje (como levantando el labio superior por el lado derecho) Una sonrisa malvada: muahahahaha (como el malvado que se ríe cuando su trampa ha funcionado) Alguien metió la pata, te sorprendes y te hace un poquito de gracia: Juas Of ...


10

It doesn't matter if you use "San" or "Santo". Edit: Diccionario Panhispánico de dudas says that "Santo" must be used with Domingo, Tomás, Tomé and Toribio. (Thanks Gonzalo Medina for pointing this out) The reason to prefer to use "Santo" is to avoid confusion in oral speech. Quoting a WordReference thread: Technically, any male saint, or "santo", ...


9

I don't know if there's any official standard about this, but: The single-letter abbreviations are: L, M, X, J, V, S, D Note that miércoles is usually written as X, so as not to confuse it with martes. Regarding múltiple letter abbreviations, the usual way is two-letter abbreviations: Lu, Ma, Mi, Ju, Vi, Sa, Do UPDATE: A reference


8

They use "jajaja": the more "ja", the stronger the laugh. But there are variations, like jejeje, which is a less strong laugh and can be a nervous laugh or an "evil" laugh. Anyway, there seem to be "alternatives" for LOL in Spanish: CMC (casi me cago) = It means "I almost p**p my pants (from laughter)"; RAC (reír a carcajadas) = lol I've also seen "MDR" ...


7

El apéndice de abreviaturas del Panhispánico de Dudas de la RAE lo recoge como: V.º B.º Esto sigue las normas generales de formación y ortografía de las de abrevaciones: Entre las abreviaturas formadas por contracción están las que presentan la letra o letras finales voladas. En general, las abreviaturas se escriben con mayúscula o minúscula ...


5

The way I see it, there is only but one single Spanish speaking country who shares a border with the U.S. and that is Mexico. Just like Americans abbreviate our country with U.S. for short Mexico by the same turn has taken it's cue from Americans and abbreviated the U.S. as E.U., Estados Unidos. If you are feeling bent out of shape because the word America ...


5

Es una abreviatura muy extendida por gran parte de latino américa y España. Se usa sobre todo en el lenguaje coloquial y es similar al caso de las terminaciones -ado -ido ... en los verbos que suele eliminarse la letra "d" ¿Has "terminao" los deberes? No, mamá son pa' pasado mañana. En ningún caso se utiliza en el lenguaje escrito


5

As you've said, small numbers are easy to find: 1/2 mitad o medio 1/3 tercio 1/4 cuarto 1/5 quinto 1/6 sexto 1/7 séptimo 1/8 octavo 1/9 noveno 1/10 décimo o décima 1/11 onceavo o undécimo 1/12 doceavo o duodécimo After that ...


4

You can use CD and DVD safely. In some countries they are pronunced as in spanish (cedé, devedé) and in others like in english (cidí, dividí). The translations are: CD (Compact disc): Disco compacto. VCD (Video CD): Disco compacto de video DVD (Digital video/versatile disc): Disco Versátil Digital, Disco de Video Digital. CD-RW: CD regrabable. DVD±RW: DVD ...


4

It’s not uncommon to abbreviate "Segunda Guerra Mundial” as SGM. 2ª GM, 2GM and IIGM are also seen. Spanish speakers and authors are not so fond of acronyms as their English counterparts, so Spanish acronyms for World War II are not as readily understandable as WWII is in English. I would call SGM the standard abbreviation. Results in Google for: ...


2

As others have pointed, pa / pa' is a common colloquial variant for para. You will hear in Latin America and Spain. Maybe it's more extended in some places than others, for example Andalusia in Spain, but I'm sure you will find someone that uses it at least from once in a while everywhere. It is not a regionalism. And as Aracem has said, its not for written ...


2

Latin abbreviations like "e.g." (also v.g. with the same meaning) and "i.e." are commonly used in "standard" (I mean, this is not snob or unusual) Spanish (specially written). If I had to translate a document/text from English to Spanish I wouldn't dare to replace them by their meaning. So my answer to your question ("Am I correct...") is "yes". Here is a ...


1

Yo diría que sí (siempre y cuando sea VºBº) http://www.dropby.com/Genealogia/abreviaturas.html Visto VoBo en lugar de Vº Bº me resulta un poco raro. Parece el nick de un adolescente poco leido (un Hoigan, vaya)



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