1
vote
2answers
1k views

Translating “They don't call me … for nothing.”

In English, there is a phrase "They don't call me ... for nothing." (showing that some nickname someone has has been confirmed by something they just did or are about to do). Is there any equivalent ...
2
votes
3answers
699 views

Break: romper vs. quebrar vs. quebrantar vs. partir

Off the top of my head, I can think of four Spanish translations for the English verb "to break": romper quebrar quebrantar partir In what cases can each be used, and what are the differences ...
1
vote
2answers
201 views

waste: desperdiciar vs. malgastar

I learned that "waste" in English can be translated as desperdiciar or malgastar in Spanish. What is the difference between these two words? Are there any cases where one is correct and the other is ...
9
votes
1answer
1k views

¿Cuál es la forma correcta de mencionar un año?(de o del)

Institucionalmente utilizo de para referirme a un año. Ejemplo: 26 de Enero de 2012 Sin embargo, intuitivamente, estoy impulsado a utilizar del en otros contextos. Ejemplo: 26 de Enero del ...
6
votes
1answer
1k views

Where does the alternate meaning for “mateo” come from?

When I was studying Spanish in college the teacher went around the room asking our names and how we had learned the language up to that point. When it came to be my turn I responded with, "Soy ...
4
votes
2answers
3k views

Querer vs Amar & Adorar

The words amar and querer according to RAE are synonyms; however, in Colombia, at least, amar is considered a stronger feeling, a highest level of love, if you can say that. For example, I can tell a ...
1
vote
1answer
1k views

Translating “how is …?” and “how was …?”

What are the options for translating the phrase "how is" or "how was," as in: How's the steak? How is your day so far? How is the traffic today? and How was your vacation? How was the meeting? ...
3
votes
2answers
391 views

What is the difference between parece and pareciera?

What is the difference between parece que and pareciera que? How are both normally translated? What tenses can be used after pareciera que, and in general how is pareciera used?
8
votes
3answers
663 views

Translation of “bloody” etc. for frustration (colloquialisms)

A random question, In English I use words like 'bloody', 'damn', 'darn', 'blimmin', 'bleedin', 'freaking', to express frustration without using harsh swear words. (Ok maybe 'freaking' is just a spin ...
2
votes
1answer
175 views

cordura vs sensatez vs juicio vs sabiduría

Other than juicio, which has the additional meaning of a legal trial, these words all have to do with wisdom, judgement, and/or sense, as I understand it. In what ways are they different?
7
votes
1answer
2k views

“Echar” vs “tirar” vs “lanzar” vs “arrojar” vs “disparar” (to throw)

The basic meaning of them all as I understand it is: To throw Disparar seems to pertain exclusively to shooting or throwing something for the sole purpose of harming (maybe to shoot is the best ...
2
votes
2answers
1k views

Words for mountain/hill [closed]

English describes landforms that rise above the surrounding land as "mountains" or "hills." What words in Spanish describe a mountain or a hill? What are the differences between them (i.e. what size ...
4
votes
2answers
2k views

Translation of “thank goodness” or “whew!”

In English, if a bad situation seems imminent but is finally avoided, we might reply with an interjection like "Thank goodness!" or "Whew!". I know "Thank goodness!" has several possible translations ...
5
votes
2answers
2k views

Translation of “how often” questions

What is the most idiomatic translation of "how often" into Spanish in questions like: How often do the buses stop here? How often does it rain in November? How often do you get headaches? How often ...
2
votes
1answer
6k views

Translation of “take your time”

In English, when making a polite request, it's common to say "take your time" (to tell the other person there's no need to rush). What is the most natural translation of this into Spanish? Is this ...
2
votes
2answers
7k views

What's the meaning of “me choca” expression?

What's the meaning of the mexican expression "me choca"? Is it used in any other regions? Examples: Me choca que cuando estoy dormido suene el teléfono y me despierte. Me choca tener que ...
4
votes
1answer
117 views

Using female nouns to refer to males, how are adjectives affected?

Here is an English example where someone is referring to a man as a turtle: That turtle is slow. He is angry because he will not win. (calling that man a turtle) In Spanish, the referenced ...
5
votes
1answer
347 views

How do you write task lists in Spanish?

In English: Go to store. Eat dinner. ... How would this be written in Spanish?
3
votes
1answer
150 views

What is the verb landarse (to be it in a game of tag)?

In Nicaragua, when children are playing tag, "to be it" is expressed using what is apparently the verb landarse: Pablo se landa. -> Pablo's it. Me lando yo. -> I'm it. I can't find landar ...
2
votes
2answers
3k views

When do two vowels in Spanish form a diphthong? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Rules applied to the separation of syllables Diphthongs (or triphthongs) are sets of two or three vowels that are pronounced as a single syllable as opposed to being ...
2
votes
1answer
318 views

How are “first” and “second” books of the Bible pronounced?

The Bible has several books in multiple parts (e.g. 1 Corintios, 2 Pedro, 3 Juan). How are these books said out loud? For example, is 1 Pedro pronounced Primer de Pedro, Primero de Pedro, Primera de ...
1
vote
1answer
2k views

Translation of “too good to be true”

In English, we say something is "too good to be true" to express that apparently amazing deals or benefits generally aren't real. Is there an equivalent phrase in Spanish?
2
votes
3answers
2k views

Are there any words in Spanish that are very difficult to translate to English? [closed]

There seem to be many words (especially technical ones) in English that don't directly translate to a single word in Spanish. What about in the other direction: are there any words in Spanish that are ...
2
votes
2answers
199 views

Insect bites vs. stings

In English, some insects bite you (like mosquitos), while other insects sting you (like bees). A bite generally involves an animal's mouth, while a sting involves another part of the animal (a bee's ...
2
votes
1answer
588 views

Software environments (development, testing, staging, production)

In software engineering, there are often multiple "environments" the codebase exists in: development testing or qa staging production What is the Spanish term used for "environment," and how are ...
11
votes
2answers
2k views

Audio maps of spanish dialects?

Apart from vocabulary differences, the spanish language has an enormous and fascinating diversity in pronunciation and accents. In my country (Argentina) people from the central inland region have a ...
4
votes
2answers
546 views

How to form statements like “It was during that time that…”

"It was" is translated as era or estaba. I know for statements like "It was happy with you" (contigo estaba feliz) that works. But what about constructions where the "it" is nothing in specific? ...
2
votes
1answer
286 views

justicia: justice and righteousness?

In the Spanish Bible, I believe the English "justice" and "righteousness" are both translated as justicia. Is justicia the only word that can translate both of these terms? Is there any way to know ...
4
votes
1answer
93 views

If you need to clarify a speaker with a pronoun, do you need to clarify all verbs in the sentence with one?

The following is ambiguous: Mientras era feliz, eres cansado y era triste. If you want to clarifiy speakers by adding pronouns to the verbs, would you have to do it to all them, or only until ...
1
vote
1answer
339 views

plan: plano vs. plan

The English "plan" can be translated into Spanish as plan or plano. What is the difference between plan and plano, and when would each one be used?
2
votes
1answer
107 views

Translation of “Great!”

In English, the interjection "Great!" can be used to respond to almost any statement. In Spanish, I've heard a few similar interjections: ¡Qué bien! ¡Qué bueno! ¡Está bien! ¡Está bueno! I've ...
3
votes
1answer
1k views

shy: tímido vs. reservado vs. vergonzoso vs. penoso

In many parts of the Spanish-speaking world, describing a person who is "shy" can be done with at least four different words: tímido reservado vergonzoso penoso What is the difference between ...
3
votes
1answer
3k views

Translation of “be nice” (said to children)

In English, if children are misbehaving, someone might correct them by saying, "Be nice!" How is this normally said in Spanish?
3
votes
1answer
2k views

Does pelón/pelona mean bald or hairy?

I have heard pelón (or the feminine pelona) used to both refer to someone who has no hair and someone who has a lot of hair. Is there any way of distinguishing whether pelón means bald or hairy, or is ...
0
votes
1answer
3k views

Translating “for the rest of the day”

What is the best way to translate the phrase "for the rest of the day" into Spanish, as in the following examples: I'm tired, I think I want to stay home for the rest of the day. Do you think it ...
2
votes
1answer
310 views

Translating “to open up” and “closed” (revealing feelings to another)

In English, "to open (oneself) up to someone" describes someone who shares their feelings and emotions with another person as opposed to someone who is "closed" and keeps their feelings to themselves? ...
1
vote
1answer
118 views

Translation of “garden shears”

Garden shears (pruning shears) are specialized scissors used in gardening. Loppers are a bigger, two-handed version used to cut larger branches. Are there specific terms in Spanish to refer to these ...
8
votes
3answers
3k views

Choosing between “Mirar” and “Ver”

What is the real difference between "Ver" and "Mirar". They are quite close in meaning but what are the differences between them? What are the rules to know whether we should choose one or the other?
4
votes
3answers
13k views

Why “¿Cómo te llamas?” means “¿Cuál es tu nombre?”?

Why does "¿Cómo te llamas?" mean "¿Cuál es tu nombre?". After all, it literally means "How do you call yourself?". Yet, most of the time, you don't call yourself anything; rather, other people call ...
5
votes
2answers
452 views

usted and its usage

I understand that usted is used for formal usage. When conjugating a verb is there a rule for its use? Must it always be used in conjunction with a conjugated verb? Or are there any instances where ...
0
votes
1answer
8k views

Translation of “What have you been up to lately?”

In English, when meeting someone you haven't seen for a while, you might ask, "What have you been up to lately?" What is the equivalent question in Spanish?
5
votes
2answers
680 views

What is the difference between “Entrometido” and “Entremetido”?

The definition of entrometido in the rae just sends you to entremetido. Is there a real difference between the two? And if there isn't then why are there two words with exactly the same meaning. ...
3
votes
2answers
11k views

Ways to say “you're welcome”

The "textbook" way to say "you're welcome" in Spanish is de nada. English has many ways to express this: You're welcome. No problem. Don't worry about it. My pleasure. What other ways are there in ...
2
votes
1answer
8k views

Spanish abbreviations of days of the week

In English, the days of the week have single-letter abbreviations (M, T, W, etc.) and three-letter abbreviations (Mon., Tue., Wed.). What are the standard ways to abbreviate the days of the week in ...
1
vote
2answers
1k views

“although” vs. “even though” vs. “though”

In English, there are three conjunctions that are very similar: although even though though Is aunque the only possible translation of these to Spanish, or are there similar synonyms in Spanish as ...
5
votes
1answer
5k views

Translation of “to catch up” (sharing recent happenings with someone you haven't seen lately)

In English, "to catch up (with each other)" can be used to describe two people that haven't seen each other in a while that are sharing recent events in their lives with each other. For example: "I ...
1
vote
1answer
442 views

Efficient: eficiente vs. eficaz

The English "efficient" can be translated as either eficiente or eficaz in Spanish. What is the difference between these two translations? In what situations can each be used?
1
vote
2answers
4k views

Translation of “Are you ok?” or “Are you alright?”

What is the best Spanish translation of the English phrase "Are you ok?" or "Are you alright?" (said out of concern for someone who has just gotten hurt, for example after tripping and falling or ...
7
votes
4answers
274 views

Is there a translation for “He thumbed his nose at them”?

In English if you "thumb your nose at someone" you are ignoring their authority.. Is there an expression in Spanish that conveys that same sort of disrespect? Edit: adding example. Many ...
4
votes
1answer
1k views

“antes que” vs. “antes de que”

What is the difference between the phrases antes que and antes de que? When should each be used? Are there contexts where one is correct and one is incorrect, or are they completely synonymous?

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