10
votes
5answers
703 views

Best way to translate 'uneducated', meaning lacking formal schooling

Generally the Spanish word maleducado more often means rude, rather than unschooled. In light of this, how would one describe someone who is polite and intelligent, but has never been formally ...
3
votes
1answer
62k views

How to respond to ¿Cómo estás? [closed]

What are the standard responses to ¿Cómo estás?? The only ones I know of are: Bien. and Muy bien. Which both are for when you are well, how do you say ok? or not so good?
6
votes
3answers
1k views

Translation of “Field” (as in, on a form)

The online automated translators tend to use campo (ie. a field, like a soccer field) for this, but I'm not sure if this appropriate. What is the proper translation here to refer to a field on a ...
9
votes
1answer
3k views

What's the difference between “sólo”, “únicamente” and “solamente”?

According to the RAE: solo o sólo. adv. m. Únicamente, solamente. In what situations is preferred to use one over the other? Are they interchangeable? Sólo es una pregunta simple....
10
votes
1answer
281 views

Plug vs Socket: Interchangeable?

Many dictionaries that I have looked at online seem to use enchufe as a word that is interchangeable for the English words plug and socket, which are two related, but distinct objects. Some ...
8
votes
1answer
236 views

Are “burro” and “aburrir” related?

Is the word aburrir (get bored) etymologically related with the word burro (donkey)? They seem to share a common root (burr). Plus, there is a spanish saying: Solo los burros se aburren
5
votes
2answers
480 views

What is the meaning of “melaza” in the song “Caras Lindas”?

This is the song. The word is translated by online lyrics, RAE and wordreference.com as molasses. But it doesn't make sense to me in the context. Somos la melaza que ríe Somos la melaza que ...
0
votes
1answer
799 views

Spanish word list for statistical analysis [closed]

I need a Spanish word list, as simple as that. The more complete it is, the better, it should contain as many words as to be a statistically relevant sample. It can be in any format, xml, excel, txt, ...
6
votes
2answers
325 views

What is the difference between requerir and exigir?

I believe that they both mean to "require." But do they refer to different "degrees" (urgencies) or types of requirments? Can they be used interchangeably or is one more suitable in some contexts and ...
14
votes
3answers
2k views

Quizás or quizá, which one is preferred?

RAE redirects the definition of quizás to quizá but I wonder if there's any implicit, secret rule that I am not aware of as to whether quizás is preferred over quizá. I've seen both forms used ...
18
votes
14answers
38k views

How do you say a “shot” referring to alcohol?

What are some common ways of saying a shot of liquor? This can be referring to a small, usually 1 to 2 ounce drink taken all at once or can be a measure of liquor. For example: I ordered a round of ...
2
votes
3answers
1k views

Translation of “first time doing something”

What is the most natural way in Spanish to talk about someone's first time doing something? For example: This is my first time eating sushi. That was the first time she's ever gone camping. Was that ...
2
votes
2answers
1k views

What is the difference between “por medio de” and “a través de”?

It seems like a través de and por medio de can often be used to mean the same thing. What is the difference between them, and in what contexts can you only use one or the other?
2
votes
1answer
749 views

Different words for “servant”

According to Wiktionary, the English "servant" has two meanings: One who serves another, providing help in some manner. (e.g. She is quite the humble servant, the poor in this city owe much to her ...
10
votes
4answers
6k views

What's the difference between rezar and orar? Are there any other ways to say 'to pray'?

My teacher told me that different religions tend to use different words for "to pray", usually choosing between rezar and orar. Which words are preferred by what religions & in which areas? Are ...
5
votes
2answers
113 views

Translation of “How far back?” in the context of time

How would I say "How far back do they want me to go?" The context of the question is that I was filling out an application where they wanted my work history. I was attempting to ask the person ...
6
votes
2answers
250 views

How to refer to a specific decade in Spanish? eg. the 1960's

In English, when you want to refer to a specific decade you simply pluralize the year: the nineteen-sixties (written 1960's) OR the nineteen-tens (written 1910's) Granted, referring to the first ...
19
votes
3answers
627 views

Are there other words that can't be written? (like sal-le)

Recently, I learned that there is at least one Spanish word that can be pronounced but not written. It is the imperative form of 'salirle'. It is prononunced as 'sal-le' and the written form should ...
5
votes
1answer
543 views

Gusto variant of the verb gustar

When I thought I finally had it figured out... I was confronted with the following phrase which obviously must mean: I liked the story of your friend. Which for me logically translates to. ...
3
votes
2answers
131 views

Translation of “How difficult was that”

How would I ask someone "How difficult was that?" ¿Qué tan difícil era? ¿Cuán difícil era? ¿Cuánto dificultad tenía eso? Other?
0
votes
2answers
97 views

What are the lyrics at the end of Ojos De Brujo's Piedras Contra Tanques

There are some lyrics at the end of the live version of Ojos De Brujo's Piedras Contra Tanques on Spotify That I'm having trouble translating. It is during the Salsa jam at the end. It's something ...
3
votes
2answers
15k views

Translation of “I would be more than happy to (do something).”

What would be some natural ways to express being "more than happy" to do something in Spanish? For example: I am more than happy to help you with your homework whenever you need it. I would ...
2
votes
1answer
1k views

What is the difference between “de corto plazo” and “a corto plazo”?

What is the difference between de corto plazo and a corto plazo (or de largo plazo and a largo plazo), meaning short-term and long-term? In what contexts can each be used?
4
votes
2answers
2k views

Translating “If (request), that would be great.”

In English, I often use the formula, "If (request), that would be great." For example: If you could go to the supermarket after work, that would be great. If it's possible for you to finish ...
4
votes
3answers
905 views

Connotations of “mortal” (slang)

What does the Spanish word mortal mean when used as slang? Does it have a positive or negative connotation towards the thing being described?
7
votes
4answers
115 views

Usage of plural in collective objects?

Even being a native speaker, I find it hard to know what's the correct way to announce in a sentence a thing that is a collection of other things, specifically in how to arrange adjectives and ...
7
votes
1answer
1k views

Why does “toalla” sound like “tualla”?

I am a native speaker from Mexico and I just noticed that the word "toalla" when pronounced sounds as if it has an "u" instead of an "o" as if you were pronouncing "tualla". This also happens with "...
4
votes
2answers
137 views

In referring to a website's appearance, how would I say Skin or Theme?

What the title says, pretty much. This is for a website with a formal tone.
13
votes
3answers
4k views

How do you say “I'm gonna get you!”?

When I'm chasing my baby around the room, I frequently tell him, "I'm gonna get you!" and catch him and tickle him. Is there a similar expression in Spanish? I'd love to find something that can be ...
8
votes
4answers
2k views

What's the meaning of the Mexican expression “se te va el avión”?

Example: Te lo dije tres veces y de todos modos no lo hiciste. A ti ya se te va el avión. ¿No te acordaste de tu cumpleaños? La verdad es que a ti ya se te va el avión. What does it mean? ...
-7
votes
2answers
487 views

What is English translation of this short audio file in Spanish ? [closed]

Please help to translate this simple audio file. audio file on soundcloud
6
votes
2answers
151 views

In what cases are “de” and “para” interchangeable?

For example in these cases "de" and "para" seem to be interchangeable: muebles de oficina / muebles para oficina juguetes de niños / juguetes para niños Are there any other cases where "de"...
6
votes
2answers
281 views

What's the function of “lo” in “lo que”?

Examples: Lo que pasa es que el niño no fue a la escuela porque se fracturo el tobillo. Lo que quiere es una computadora para hacer sus tareas. Lo que dice es mentira. Lo que no ...
8
votes
2answers
2k views

What's the plural of “suéter”?

What's the plural of "suéter"? In Mexico, most of the times is called "sueters". Is it "sueters" or "suéteres"?
5
votes
2answers
115 views

Why “fiestas de árboles” and not “árboles de fiestas”?

I encountered the expression "fiestas de árboles" in a song by a Chilean singer whose lyrics are: Tus ojos son fiestas de árboles, son mi ventana. Son estrellas que guían mi caravana. Google ...
11
votes
3answers
738 views

Is “versus” a Spanish word?

RAE says no, wordreference says yes. Is it used or understood by the Spanish speakers?
6
votes
2answers
1k views

What is the correct way to say the days of a month?

People refer to the days of the month as following: 1 de enero = uno de enero o primero de enero. 2 de enero = dos de enero. 3 de enero = tres de enero. ... Example: Hoy es primero de enero. ...
7
votes
2answers
7k views

forever: por siempre vs. para siempre

I have seen "forever" translated as both por siempre and para siempre. What is the difference? Are there contexts where you must use one or the other?
2
votes
3answers
128 views

What is the preferred word to use to know if the partner is grasping what you are explaining?

Suppose that you are explaining something to someone. Which of these is more appropriate to use? ¿Me entiendes? ¿Me explico? If you use "me explico" it could be interpreted as if you are ...
7
votes
1answer
274 views

Is “mas sin embargo” a pleonasm?

I've seen and heard "mas sin embargo". My questions are: Is it correct to use "mas sin embargo"? Is it a pleonasm? Example: Mario tiene que hacer mucha tarea, mas sin embargo está jugando. ...
9
votes
3answers
43k views

Difference between “mas” and “más”

What's the difference between mas and más? What rules should I follow to know which one to use? Could you provide examples showing their uses?
3
votes
3answers
792 views

Translating “Help!” (interjection)

In English, if there is any kind of emergency or urgent assistance needed, we use the interjection, "Help!" In Spanish I've seen several: ¡Socorro! ¡Auxilio! ¡Ayuda! or ¡Ayúdame! Which of these is ...
1
vote
2answers
152 views

Translating “wise” (not referring to a person, e.g. “wise decision”)

As I understand it, wise is normally translated as sabio when referring to a person. What about when not referring to a person? For example: I don't think that would be a very wise decision. ...
3
votes
1answer
8k views

Grammar of tengo and tienes

I am having trouble understanding how to use tienes/tengo and other related "have" words. For example, in my current lesson in Rosetta Stone, the following examples are used: Tengo anteojos de ...
13
votes
8answers
22k views

How might you say a child is “cute” in Spanish?

Suppose you see a mother with a laughing little 2-year-old. In English, we might exclaim, "how cute!" I've had trouble saying this in Spanish. The word "cute" means something like "beautiful", but it ...
5
votes
2answers
221 views

Why, when, and how did vowels E and I get special treatment from consonants like C,G & Q?

I think this question may involve more than Spanish, and may include Romance languages or even Latin. I wonder why, when, and how did vowels E and I get special treatment from consonants like C, G, ...
6
votes
3answers
772 views

Translations of 'anyway'

I spoke with a friend that I haven't spoken to in a long time. He started with a question about a test he is having. After I answered the question, I wanted to ask him: "How have you been anyway?" ...
3
votes
2answers
4k views

Difference between “está” and “esta” or “esté” and “este”?

How do I know if I have to use the one with accent and not the one without accent? Could you provide examples?
11
votes
6answers
36k views

What is the difference between “De nada” and “No hay de qué”?

I am learning Spanish and ran across "De nada" and "No hay de qué". Both mean "You're welcome" . What's the difference?
2
votes
3answers
489 views

Continuing education after high school [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Spanish After Mango Languages Recently, I've been interested in learning a language. I took three years of Spanish in high school, and while I did better than the average ...

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