6
votes
6answers
2k views

Definition of 'escuela' and 'colegio'

Spanish has two generic words for school: escuela and colegio. I have heard different explanations for what phases of schooling each word refers to. For example, I've been told that colegio refers ...
5
votes
4answers
458 views

What is the common construction of questions spoken by native speakers of Spanish?

The following question is within a lesson on Memrise.com: Example1: ¿Conoció tu madre a tu padre en una estación de tren? Did your mother meet your father at a train station? Being that I'...
5
votes
6answers
1k views

¿“Hater” en castellano?

En la jerga de internet, es muy común usar el anglicismo "hater": Últimamente Twitter está lleno de haters: cada vez que alguien publica algo sobre el partido X, lo critican sin misericordia. "...
4
votes
1answer
6k views

¿Por qué “había” lleva tilde? ¿Acaso no se pronunciaría de la misma forma si no la tuviese?

Según lo que he leído "había" lleva tilde para romper el diptongo pero en caso de que la palabra no tuviese tilde, no se sobreentiende que si no lleva tilde en la "a" se prenunciara igual a que si ...
4
votes
3answers
295 views

¿Cómo se dice “play” en el contexto de música o un DVD?

En inglés usamos la palabra "play" para significar la acción de ver una película o de escuchar música. La usamos así: Can you play the movie? What song is playing? Pregunté un amigo latino ...
4
votes
12answers
3k views

Exception to the Phonetic Rule

As we all know that Spanish is a Phonetic Language, i.e. the way it's written is the way it's pronounced. I am just curious to know if there are any exceptions to this phonetic rule. I mean, when we ...
4
votes
5answers
360 views

“Fall in love with” (non-romantic)

English: In English, you can use the phrase "to fall in love with" with people who you aren't literally in love with. For example, when talking about children, you might say: You just fall in ...
4
votes
1answer
216 views

How to hispanizise (rather unknown) German toponyms with umlaut?

If one is interested in proper names in German, like München or Zürich, one easily knows the Spanish translation, and if not, one goes to Wikipedia and finds the translation. But what to do with ...
3
votes
1answer
570 views

“Ir a” versus future tense when asking a question

I've read that one should use "ir a" when time of completion is certain. If the time is uncertain, one should use the future tense. This choice is not so clear-cut when asking a question. Take for ...
3
votes
1answer
163 views

Los valores de SE

Encontré unas preguntas cuando estuve haciendo los ejercicios sobre los valores de SE. ¿Podrían ayudarme? SE le trató muy bien. (Creí que es Verbo Pronominal por tratarse, pero la correcta es, ¿"...
3
votes
2answers
86k views

¿Es correcto abreviar “visto bueno ” como “VoBo.”?

Muchas veces he visto que lo abrevian así por ejemplo dentro de la compañía donde trabajo, sin embargo no sé si realmente es correcto. Actualización: Lo que me parece extraño de la abreviación es ...
3
votes
2answers
243 views

“Home” in a non-literal sense

I know home translates as casa or, in some contexts, hogar. But both these terms refer to a more literal idea than I'd like to use at times. They both seem to refer to the actual house. Let's imagine ...
2
votes
2answers
1k views

Spanish names for preterite and imperfect tenses

In school, I learned that the Spanish past tenses were called preterite and imperfect in English, and preterito and imperfecto in Spanish. However, in talking to native speakers I've run across other ...
2
votes
1answer
175 views

“No es culpa mía (de) que …”

On spanish.about.com they explain that you would use "que" if you can replace the English "that" with "which" and it would still make sense. So, it's a pronoun. El plan que quiere es caro. (The ...
2
votes
1answer
71 views

¿Se debe usar el indicativo o el subjuntivo en esta pregunta?

Hace unos meses, se hizo esta pregunta: ¿Cuál es la palabra más larga en español que no repite ninguna letra? En un comentario pregunté si sería mejor usar el subjuntivo —es decir, emplear repita en ...
2
votes
1answer
63 views

¿Cuál es la historia de la palabra “chilango”?

En México se utiliza el término "chilango" para referirse a las personas originarias del Distrito Federal. ¿Cuál es la historia de la palabra "chilango"? ¿De dónde se origina?
2
votes
2answers
274 views

Duda pretérito perfecto e imperfecto

Estoy corrigiendo un texto sobre una película, tratando de ayudar a un amigo que está aprendiendo español, y tengo una duda sobre el uso del pretérito perfecto e imperfecto. Cuantas más vueltas le doy,...
2
votes
1answer
6k views

How should “have been” be translated?

I often use the phrase "have been" (or "has been") in English in sentences like: It has been raining a lot recently. I have been thinking about the exam all week. It's been a long time since I've ...
2
votes
3answers
2k views

What are the differences between “tener” and “haber”?

Both verbs tener and haber both are translated as to have. What are the rules that distinguish their uses of one verb over the other?
1
vote
6answers
703 views

Where else 'Se' in comerse will be used

Objective Clarify the grammar and the objective of se in comerse/beberse Clarify which other verbs can take se for the same objective Related article El uso de "comerse" ¿Cuá...
1
vote
2answers
394 views

definite article - and the use of “al”

I'm currently learning Spanish Grammar and hoping someone can help me out. I have a sentence in my book which is: Me gusta jugar al fútbol. And another sentence: Juega al fútbol todos los ...
1
vote
1answer
126 views

Doubt over using “como” or “cómo”

From the lyrics of a song: y lo que más me gusta de ti es como tú pronuncias mi nombre Which is correct here, "como" with or without accent?
0
votes
3answers
141 views

How do I say ‘Watching him eat makes me hungry’?

How do I say ‘Watching him eat makes me hungry’ in Spanish? Lo veo comer me tiene hambre.
0
votes
4answers
1k views

What is the best way to refer to those of Spanish descent or language?

In English there are several ways to refer to people who speak Spanish or are from a Spanish-speaking country: Hispanic, Latin, Latino, Chicano, Spanish-speaking, etc. What equivalent terms exist in ...
17
votes
4answers
7k views

Is “¿Qué hora es?” or “¿Qué horas son?” preferred?

Admittedly, it has been a very long time since I've studied Spanish, but I distinctly recall that we always used "¿Que hora es?" for "what time is it?". However, on a trip to the Dominican Republic, ...
15
votes
3answers
687 views

¿Por qué “cirugía” y “quirúrgico”, teniendo la misma raíz, se pronuncian diferente?

Leo en la RAE el origen etimológico de las palabras quirúrgico y cirugía y veo que son el mismo: quirúrgico, ca. (Del lat. chirurgĭcus, y este del gr. χειρουργικός). cirugía. (Del ...
13
votes
4answers
6k views

“Bueno” as hello or greeting?

In the US State I live in, I sometimes hear Spanish speakers greet one another by simply staying "Bueno". I didn't hear this when I was recently in Mexico, although I realize I may just have not ...
13
votes
4answers
11k views

“True” meaning of “por cierto”

I have always thought of the expression of "por cierto" as meaning "certainly" or "surely." It certainly "looks" that way (for certainly). And even Google Translate gives it that meaning, as well as "...
12
votes
6answers
3k views

What are the main differences between Spanish in Spain and Spanish in Latin America? [closed]

A good analogy is that the difference is like those in British and American English, but what are those differences exactly? Is Spanish in Latin America a branch from that in Spain?
11
votes
5answers
3k views

Are there any nouns with irregular plurals in Spanish?

In English, some nouns have regular plural forms ending in -s or -es and fewer are irregular. Fish in the plural is still fish while child becomes children. In Spanish, nearly all nouns are regular, ...
11
votes
6answers
36k views

What is the difference between “De nada” and “No hay de qué”?

I am learning Spanish and ran across "De nada" and "No hay de qué". Both mean "You're welcome" . What's the difference?
10
votes
3answers
2k views

Was “rr” ever considered officially a letter of the Spanish alphabet?

Everybody agrees that the Spanish digraphs "ch" and "ll" used to be officially separate "letters" up to the time the RAE changed the rules of Spanish alphabetization in 1994. But when it comes to the ...
10
votes
11answers
3k views

What is the longest word in Spanish?

What is the longest word in Spanish accepted by the Real Academia Española? What about words not officially accepted by the RAE? ¿Cuál es la palabra en español más larga aceptada por la Real ...
10
votes
1answer
298 views

¿Por qué se usa el subjuntivo en esta frase?

La portada del libro Guerra de Yugurta (ISBN 968366153X) tiene esta frase: La Biblioteca Sciptorvm Graecorvm et Romanorvm edita por segunda ocasión la Guerra de Yugurta, los Fragmentos de las ...
10
votes
5answers
9k views

How to translate the idiomatic expressions “I wish!” and “You wish!”

What's the best way to say "I wish!" as in... A: I hear you're a good dancer. B: Ha! I wish! Or... A: Will you help me move this piano? B: Ha! You wish! What is the best way to ...
9
votes
3answers
7k views

Spanish abbreviation for the United States of America

What is (or are?) the suggested abbreviation(s) for the United States of America in Spanish? I've seen: E.E.U.U. EE.UU. EEUU EUA USA (And only the last two actually makes any sense to me!)
8
votes
2answers
499 views

Is “remover” a good translation for “to remove”?

In the Internet I've often come across to internationalized websites where they have things like: Remove file / Remover archivo I always thought this translation may be done by someone who is ...
8
votes
3answers
6k views

¡Buenas! greeting in morning

Another question brings up the fact that in many countries, ¡Buenas! is used as a greeting (as an abbreviation of Buenas tardes or Buenas noches). In regions where this is the case, what should be ...
8
votes
4answers
7k views

“Maje” (or “mae”) in Nicaraguan Spanish

What does the word "maje" (pronounced "mae") mean in Nicaraguan Spanish? Could the word be considered offensive, and, if so, in what contexts is it appropriate to use?
8
votes
1answer
634 views

¿Cuál es el origen de la frase “media naranja”?

Español He oído la frase "media naranja" unas veces, y puedo entender el contexto, que significa una pareja o novia, por ejemplo. Pero quiero saber el origen de esa frase. English I have heard the ...
8
votes
3answers
2k views

¿Cuál es el origen de la palabra 'antro'?

Hoy en dia, en México, se dice 'antro' a un club/discoteca o simplemente un bar. ¿De dónde viene la palabra? ¿Cuándo se empezó a usar?
8
votes
1answer
375 views

“Soy yo el que vine…” or “soy yo el que vino…”?

What is often heard is "Soy yo el que vine ayer a ... " (I am the one who came yesterday to...) but I think that "Soy yo el que vino ayer a ... " is the correct sentence because the ...
8
votes
3answers
383 views

How does one chain noun adjuncts in Spanish?

A noun adjunct is a noun that modifies another noun. For example, the word "baby" in the phrase "baby food" is a noun adjunct. In this simple case, you can translate it into Spanish as "comida de bebé"...
8
votes
1answer
188 views

Indirect object and “le”

La madre le lava la cara a la niña. In that sentence, why is the word "le" there? The sentence already has a indirect object ("a la niña"), but removing the "le" makes the sentence to sound ...
7
votes
1answer
1k views

“Te va (a) encantar” - is “a” necessary?

Is the "a" necessary when using "ir a" to convey future meaning? Google gives 17m results for "te va a encantar" but also 1.5m for "te va encantar". Does this rule vary according to formality?
7
votes
2answers
1k views

Grammar of “¡A comer!”

I was recently staying with a Mexican family, and during lunch, the children (ages 8 and 5) were being rather unruly. The grandmother would command them: ¡A comer! I have never heard a command in ...
7
votes
3answers
3k views

¿Cuál es la diferencia entre comer y comerse?

¿Cuál es la diferencia entre el verbo normal comer y su forma reflexiva comerse? Si los significados son iguales, ¿cuál es la diferencia de connotación? Y, ¿se usa el reflexivo de la misma manera en ...
7
votes
9answers
5k views

¿Qué significa “salir del paso?”

Estoy leyendo esta página, y tiene la frase: Es una solución para salir del paso. Da mejores resultados entre idiomas de origen indoeuropeo, como es de esperar. Pero si se necesita una traducción ...
7
votes
2answers
592 views

How would you express giving a command to yourself in Spanish?

As there is no singular first person imperative form for Spanish verbs (as far as I know), I was wondering whether there is an equivalent to the, possibly idiomatic, English expression of a person ...
7
votes
3answers
4k views

What is the meaning of “que” and “cual” without an accent mark?

What does "que" and "cual" mean without an accent mark? How do they compare when to each other? How do they compare to their accent-marked form?

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