3
votes
1answer
2k views

Translation of “be nice” (said to children)

In English, if children are misbehaving, someone might correct them by saying, "Be nice!" How is this normally said in Spanish?
3
votes
1answer
527 views

shy: tímido vs. reservado vs. vergonzoso vs. penoso

In many parts of the Spanish-speaking world, describing a person who is "shy" can be done with at least four different words: tímido reservado vergonzoso penoso What is the difference between ...
0
votes
1answer
2k views

Words for boat, ship, and other seafaring vessels

In English, we have many words to describe the different types of vessels that travel on water: boat ship yacht dinghy canoe kayak raft watercraft vessel sailboat barge catamaran lifeboat/liferaft ...
3
votes
1answer
1k views

Does pelón/pelona mean bald or hairy?

I have heard pelón (or the feminine pelona) used to both refer to someone who has no hair and someone who has a lot of hair. Is there any way of distinguishing whether pelón means bald or hairy, or is ...
5
votes
4answers
153 views

Usage of the word acullá

WordReference translates acullá as "yonder." Is this a word that was only used in the past, or is it still used in modern Spanish today? If so, what regions does it appear in and how is it used?
8
votes
6answers
5k views

What is the difference between allí and ahí (“there”)?

English What is the difference between allí and ahí? Is there any difference in pronunciation between the two? Are there any contexts where one is correct and one is wrong, or are they completely ...
1
vote
1answer
921 views

Translation of “too good to be true”

In English, we say something is "too good to be true" to express that apparently amazing deals or benefits generally aren't real. Is there an equivalent phrase in Spanish?
13
votes
4answers
2k views

¿Cuál es la etimología de “al fin y al cabo”?

La expresión fijada "al fin y al cabo" en Inglés sería algo como "at the end of the day, in the end, after all". Pero quería saber, ¿se conoce la etimología? En la entrada "al fin y al cabo" en ...
3
votes
3answers
488 views

Translation of “I have a feeling…”

What's the best way to translate "I have a feeling..." This is not feeling as in feeling happy/sad etc, but instead more of an instinct/idea/guess. Eg. I have a feeling that someone here knows ...
2
votes
1answer
187 views

Translating “to open up” and “closed” (revealing feelings to another)

In English, "to open (oneself) up to someone" describes someone who shares their feelings and emotions with another person as opposed to someone who is "closed" and keeps their feelings to themselves? ...
1
vote
1answer
6k views

Translating “kind words” (as in “Thank you for your kind words.”)

In English if someone complements you or expresses their gratitude for something you've done, you can respond with something like, "Thank you for your kind words." What Spanish phrase would best ...
3
votes
1answer
972 views

Translation of “personal statement”

What phrase in Spanish is used to describe a "personal statement" (i.e. a short essay composed for a college application, for example)?
8
votes
4answers
2k views

Waterfall: cascada vs. catarata

What is the difference between cascada and catarata as translations for the English "waterfall"? Are they synonyms, or is there a difference?
7
votes
4answers
2k views

Armpit: sobaco vs. axila

"Armpit" in English can be translated as either sobaco or axila in Spanish. Is each term used in different regions, or are they both used across the Spanish-speaking world? What is the difference, or ...
1
vote
1answer
91 views

Translation of “garden shears”

Garden shears (pruning shears) are specialized scissors used in gardening. Loppers are a bigger, two-handed version used to cut larger branches. Are there specific terms in Spanish to refer to these ...
5
votes
2answers
335 views

What is the difference between “Entrometido” and “Entremetido”?

The definition of entrometido in the rae just sends you to entremetido. Is there a real difference between the two? And if there isn't then why are there two words with exactly the same meaning. ...
5
votes
4answers
2k views

“s” final en tiempo pretérito indefinido: -aste(s), -iste(s)

Español La segunda persona singular del pretérito indefinido generalmente termina en "-aste" o "-iste". En muchos lugares, la gente agrega una "s" final a estas palabras (por ejemplo, hablastes en ...
1
vote
2answers
430 views

“although” vs. “even though” vs. “though”

In English, there are three conjunctions that are very similar: although even though though Is aunque the only possible translation of these to Spanish, or are there similar synonyms in Spanish as ...
2
votes
3answers
908 views

Spanish phonetic alphabet

In English, there are several forms of the "phonetic alphabet" used to spell words in such a way that there can be no confusion what letter is said. For example, the military and aviation use: ...
2
votes
1answer
3k views

Spanish abbreviations of days of the week

In English, the days of the week have single-letter abbreviations (M, T, W, etc.) and three-letter abbreviations (Mon., Tue., Wed.). What are the standard ways to abbreviate the days of the week in ...
1
vote
3answers
6k views

Translation of “llevar a cabo”

What does the Spanish phrase llevar a cabo mean in English? What are the most common translations of the phrase into English?
1
vote
1answer
268 views

Efficient: eficiente vs. eficaz

The English "efficient" can be translated as either eficiente or eficaz in Spanish. What is the difference between these two translations? In what situations can each be used?
4
votes
1answer
2k views

Translation of “to catch up” (sharing recent happenings with someone you haven't seen lately)

In English, "to catch up (with each other)" can be used to describe two people that haven't seen each other in a while that are sharing recent events in their lives with each other. For example: "I ...
0
votes
1answer
4k views

Translation of “What have you been up to lately?”

In English, when meeting someone you haven't seen for a while, you might ask, "What have you been up to lately?" What is the equivalent question in Spanish?
4
votes
2answers
317 views

usted and its usage

I understand that usted is used for formal usage. When conjugating a verb is there a rule for its use? Must it always be used in conjunction with a conjugated verb? Or are there any instances where ...
1
vote
2answers
2k views

Translation of “Are you ok?” or “Are you alright?”

What is the best Spanish translation of the English phrase "Are you ok?" or "Are you alright?" (said out of concern for someone who has just gotten hurt, for example after tripping and falling or ...
1
vote
2answers
4k views

Translation of “What's wrong?”

What is the most natural translation of the English phrase, "What's wrong?" (i.e. what you would ask a person who appears sad or hurt or withdrawn)? ¿Qué te pasó? would be one option, but that seems ...
8
votes
2answers
4k views

“después que” vs. “después de que”

Along the lines of another question I asked, what is the difference between después que and después de que? Is the situation the same as for antes? When are they synonymous, and when is one correct ...
3
votes
2answers
3k views

Ways to say “you're welcome”

The "textbook" way to say "you're welcome" in Spanish is de nada. English has many ways to express this: You're welcome. No problem. Don't worry about it. My pleasure. What other ways are there in ...
3
votes
1answer
761 views

“antes que” vs. “antes de que”

What is the difference between the phrases antes que and antes de que? When should each be used? Are there contexts where one is correct and one is incorrect, or are they completely synonymous?
6
votes
1answer
8k views

When should the subjunctive be used after “mientras”?

When should mientras or mientras que be followed by the subjunctive and when by the indicative? In both cases, how is mientras usually translated?
7
votes
3answers
1k views

Choosing between “Mirar” and “Ver”

What is the real difference between "Ver" and "Mirar". They are quite close in meaning but what are the differences between them? What are the rules to know whether we should choose one or the other?
4
votes
3answers
6k views

Why “¿Cómo te llamas?” means “¿Cuál es tu nombre?”?

Why does "¿Cómo te llamas?" mean "¿Cuál es tu nombre?". After all, it literally means "How do you call yourself?". Yet, most of the time, you don't call yourself anything; rather, other people call ...
2
votes
1answer
365 views

Most common verbs

I am a spanish learner and I figured out that I really need to learn the verbs. Is there a good (preferably online) resource with let's say the 100 most common verbs and conjugation to get me started. ...
1
vote
1answer
350 views

Studying Spanish at school in a Spanish speaking country

In the Spanish speaking country where you live or have been, up to what age/year level is it compulsory to study the Spanish language at school. Where I live (English speaking country) it is ...
7
votes
7answers
1k views

Learning programming in a Spanish speaking country

This question is for anyone who has learned programming in a Spanish speaking country. Seeing as though the key words for programming languages like Java, C, Python etc are all in English I have a ...
2
votes
1answer
279 views

7up in Spanish speaking countries

When I first went to Argentina a long time ago I spent 5 minutes trying to ask the person at the bar in a club for a glass of "Siete up" until they eventually understood that I wanted a glass of ...
6
votes
2answers
5k views

Is there a translation for “cougar”?

I mean cougar as in a middle-aged woman seeking a romantic relationship with a younger man. I know the term asaltacunas, but this applies to both men and women, so I would like to know if there is a ...
5
votes
3answers
1k views

What's the meaning of “Y yo voy y me lo creo”?

What's the meaning of "Y yo voy y me lo creo"? I encountered it in a Spanish novel. With 146,000 Google.es hits, it seems to be a set expression. Context helps, but doesn't remove all doubts.
10
votes
3answers
1k views

Why is it 'Santo' Tomás/Domingo, not 'san'?

As far as I know, those two are the only exceptions. Is there a particular reason for this?
3
votes
3answers
655 views

Latinoamérica, Hispanoamérica, or Sudamérica?

Latinoamérica, Hispanoamérica, Sudamérica or other? For someone living in Venezuela or Chile, for example, what term would I be most likely to hear to describe countries south of the US? The terms ...
2
votes
3answers
120 views

Translation of “CD” and “DVD”

What are the possibilities for translating "CD" (Compact Disc) and "DVD" (Digital Video/Versatile Disc) into Spanish?
6
votes
3answers
5k views

Translation of “bowl”

I have heard many different translations for bowl (the dish) in different Spanish-speaking countries. What words are normally used to translate "bowl"? Which is most universally understood? What ...
2
votes
1answer
245 views

Vocabulary related to the nose

What are the most common ways of saying: to blow one's nose to pick one's nose stuffy nose runny nose nasal congestion
2
votes
2answers
2k views

Is there a rule for forming the diminutive of names?

In Spanish, the diminutive form of names can be used to affectionately refer to someone. Are there any rules for how to derive the diminutive form of names (of people, not places), or is it different ...
4
votes
5answers
6k views

Most accurate translation of “possum”

What is the most universal Spanish word to describe a possum? What regional variations exist? Does the translation refer specifically to the same animal as the English word, or does it cover a larger ...
6
votes
1answer
113 views

Polite terms for excrement

There are many vulgar terms for excrement, but what are the non-vulgar, polite ones (used in medical settings, or with children, or among adults in polite conversation)?
5
votes
5answers
2k views

Argentine slang 're'

In Argentina I often hear the word (or prefix?) 're' meaning 'very/real/really' Some examples are: La prueba fue re difícil La película era re chota Estoy re bien Is 're' an ...
10
votes
2answers
1k views

Audio maps of spanish dialects?

Apart from vocabulary differences, the spanish language has an enormous and fascinating diversity in pronunciation and accents. In my country (Argentina) people from the central inland region have a ...
6
votes
4answers
2k views

Translation of “cheesy”

What is the best Spanish translation of the English word "cheesy" (something inauthentic, trying too hard to be funny, cheap, shabby, etc.)?

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