1
vote
2answers
135 views

Translating “wise” (not referring to a person, e.g. “wise decision”)

As I understand it, wise is normally translated as sabio when referring to a person. What about when not referring to a person? For example: I don't think that would be a very wise decision. ...
3
votes
1answer
3k views

Grammar of tengo and tienes

I am having trouble understanding how to use tienes/tengo and other related "have" words. For example, in my current lesson in Rosetta Stone, the following examples are used: Tengo anteojos de ...
8
votes
6answers
8k views

How might you say a child is “cute” in Spanish?

Suppose you see a mother with a laughing little 2-year-old. In English, we might exclaim, "how cute!" I've had trouble saying this in Spanish. The word "cute" means something like "beautiful", but it ...
4
votes
2answers
149 views

Why, when, and how did vowels E and I get special treatment from consonants like C,G & Q?

I think this question may involve more than Spanish, and may include Romance languages or even Latin. I wonder why, when, and how did vowels E and I get special treatment from consonants like C, G, ...
5
votes
3answers
412 views

Translations of 'anyway'

I spoke with a friend that I haven't spoken to in a long time. He started with a question about a test he is having. After I answered the question, I wanted to ask him: "How have you been anyway?" ...
3
votes
2answers
2k views

Difference between “está” and “esta” or “esté” and “este”?

How do I know if I have to use the one with accent and not the one without accent? Could you provide examples?
5
votes
3answers
12k views

What is the difference between “De nada” and “No hay de qué”?

I am learning Spanish and ran across "De nada" and "No hay de qué". Both mean "You're welcome" . What's the difference?
2
votes
3answers
214 views

Continuing education after high school [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Spanish After Mango Languages Recently, I've been interested in learning a language. I took three years of Spanish in high school, and while I did better than the ...
4
votes
1answer
382 views

Why does “mostrar a” mean “to show” and not “to show to”?

Tengo una biblia bilingüe. En el 14 capítulo de Juan, cuenta así una conversación entre Jesús y uno de su discípulos: --Señor-- dijo Felipe--, muéstranos al Padre y con eso nos basta. ...
1
vote
2answers
151 views

Origin of 'r' in 'rencontrar'

The Spanish equivalent of the English word "encounter" is "rencontrar." Why does the Spanish version have the beginning "r" when the English one doesn't? The source is the Spanish version of "Tea ...
1
vote
0answers
377 views

Good News/Chat/Cultural Podcasts in Spanish? [closed]

I spoke Spanish fluently, but it's been 10 years since I lived in Mexico. I'm definitely past the learn Spanish podcasts listed here. Are there good news podcasts available? I'm looking for something ...
5
votes
2answers
90 views

Convention for group-recited, gender-specific, self-referencing pronouns

What convention (or conventions) exist for words that are recited by a group of people, but refer to oneself using gender-specific pronouns? The most common context is probably group worship in a ...
4
votes
1answer
75 views

“Te elegimos a ti en concreto”. Isn't it pleonasm? When is it allowed?

I'm reading a book and there's this phrase: Te elegimos a ti en concreto I wonder in what situations should the objective pronoum be repeated this way. Or it's allowed to be repeated.
4
votes
3answers
454 views

Why is sport in Spanish 'deporte' and not 'esporte'?

One would expect that the Spanish word for 'sport' would be esporte (as in special => especial, spaghetti => espagueti, Spain => España, etc.). But it's actually deporte. Why does it begin with de- ...
8
votes
6answers
5k views

Is there a trick to remembering 'llevar' and 'traer'?

After years of living in a Spanish-speaking country, and speaking mostly only Spanish all day, I still struggle with 'llevar' and 'traer'. The rules are clear and all, but it is just very difficult to ...
18
votes
3answers
1k views

Ser and estar for location

The edge-cases of ser and estar still seem to get me. My understanding is that when speaking of a location, I should use estar. La biblioteca está aquí. However, a student I am tutoring had a ...
5
votes
3answers
4k views

When should I use 'al'?

I am trying to tell the difference between 'al' and 'a' to refer to a place. I know that you usually use a to refer to a country. But when should you use al? I am trying to teach someone the ...
6
votes
1answer
95 views

Word : se quedaban

Please read the below sentence: Ya que los mayores iban a el campo a trabajar, los niños se quedaban y jugaban juntos. In English it means: Since the older went to work in the field, the ...
3
votes
3answers
179 views

Throughput in Spanish?

I just wanted to know the best (preferably a single-word) translation of the English word throughput. Would you opt for capacidad, rendimiento or función de transferencia? Thanks Artur
8
votes
3answers
260 views

How does one chain noun adjuncts in Spanish?

A noun adjunct is a noun that modifies another noun. For example, the word "baby" in the phrase "baby food" is a noun adjunct. In this simple case, you can translate it into Spanish as "comida de ...
1
vote
2answers
81 views

Difference between “susto” and “aprensión”

Del susto y la aprensión, el rujido ha cesado. What are the differences between "susto" and "aprensión"? Both mean fear, no? Or they have different degrees of fear?
4
votes
3answers
154 views

Difference between: “susurro” and “murmullo”

Are susurro and murmullo interchangeable?
6
votes
1answer
823 views

Difference between “oreja” and “oído”

What is the difference between oreja and oído? Both mean ear, no?
9
votes
4answers
2k views

When is uppercase used in English but lowercase in Spanish?

There are many cases where English uses capital letters (e.g. January) but Spanish uses lowercase (e.g. enero). Grammar or orthography books have long lists of all the cases where capital letters are ...
6
votes
3answers
368 views

feliz vs. alegre vs. dichoso

I recently heard dichoso used to mean feliz. Looking up dichoso in a dictionary shows it means "happy" (or "blessed"). What is the difference between dichoso, feliz, and alegre to mean "happy"? Are ...
4
votes
1answer
199 views

What is the rule for forming fractional numbers?

What is the rule for forming fractional numbers (half, quarter, tenth, twenty-second, etc.) in Spanish? The small numbers are easy to find in a dictionary (tercio, octavo, etc.), but how would you ...
2
votes
2answers
257 views

Word usage: “caminamos” VS “caminábamos”

Please read the below sentence which is in the past tense. Can I replace "caminamos" to "caminábamos" to describe a continued action? Así que caminamos de tienda en tienda para comprar las ...
2
votes
2answers
76 views

Difference between “enterar por” and “enterar de”

Please read the following sentences: Nos enteramos por las noticias que las flores valían más caras que los años anteriores. Al comenzar este invierno me enteré de la noticia de que haría/iba a ...
4
votes
2answers
403 views

Difference between “un poco de” and “un poco”

What is the difference between the use of "un poco de" and "un poco"? Why can't we say "Es un poco de moreno"(He has a little dark skin.) but "Es un poco moreno."?? Could you please provide some ...
6
votes
3answers
110 views

pensaban que no había suficientes habitaciones VS no pensaban que hubieran suficientes habitaciones

Algunas personas pensaban que no había suficientes habitaciones para acomodar a tantos visitantes. VS Algunas personas no pensaban que hubiera suficientes habitacions para acomodar ...
1
vote
3answers
2k views

Singular and plural of pants, shorts, jeans, etc

In English, words like pants, shorts, and jeans appear to be in the plural but really refer to one item of clothing (I don't know what the technical term for it is). To be more specific, you can say ...
2
votes
3answers
906 views

Translation of “ASAP”

What is the most common translation of ASAP (As Soon As Possible) in Spanish? I have seen: cuanto antes cuanto antes posible lo más pronto posible cuanto antes, mejor Are these all common and ...
0
votes
2answers
284 views

Translation of “have (someone) do (something)”

What is the most common way in Spanish to express "have (someone) do (something)"? For example, a boss might say to his secretary: Have the marketing manager come see me ASAP!
1
vote
3answers
128 views

Translation of “desafuero” to English

WordReference says that the Spanish word desafuero can be used to refer to the "withdrawal of parliamentary/ministerial privileges." I recently saw this word used in this sense in a newspaper article. ...
3
votes
2answers
259 views

“matricular” y “matricularme”

Both the captioned words mean "enroll, register". "matricular" is a transitive verb and "matricularse" is a reflexive verb. But they have no difference in meaning but just "matricular" follows a noun ...
6
votes
2answers
1k views

Differences betwen “ahí”, “allí”, y “allá”

I am confused with the uses of "ahí", "allí" and "allá". It seems they are used according to different situations. Could you please tell me what are the differences and provide some examples? Thanks!
3
votes
1answer
740 views

What does “le” mean here?

Please look at this sentence: ¿Pero hacen algo los críos, no? ¿Las marmotas ? no. No, es la marmota que le sale. Es la marmota y ... Es como si le saliera un grano al mar , un ...
5
votes
1answer
402 views

What does “les” mean here?

Please read the following sentence: Tras años de litigios, en tres semanas, esas monedas de oro y plata estarán en donde les corresponde es decir, en nuestro país. What does "les" mean? If ...
3
votes
1answer
344 views

Words for “to encourage”: alentar, animar, fomentar

In English, "to encourage" seems to have at least two uses: to suggest that someone should do something (e.g. "He encouraged me to find a new guitar teacher.") to give confidence or hope to someone ...
3
votes
2answers
12k views

When is “me encanta” romantic?

I have heard that me gusta usually has a romantic connotation when referring to people (as opposed to just saying that you get along well with someone). What about me encanta? Does it always have ...
2
votes
3answers
120 views

Translation of “twang”

In English (at least American English), "twang" is an onomatopoeia describing the sound of a plucked or vibrating string. It also describes a characteristic of that sound (more common in, say, country ...
4
votes
1answer
111 views

“Mariscal de campo” for “quarterback”

The American football position of quarterback is sometimes translated to Spanish as mariscal de campo (literally field marshal) It does not seem like this is the official translation since RAE limits ...
3
votes
3answers
1k views

Translation of “real estate”

I have read that "real estate" can be translated as: bienes raíces bienes inmuebles inmuebles What is the difference between these terms, and which is the most generic translation of "real ...
3
votes
4answers
43k views

congratulations: felicidades vs. felicitaciones

English I have heard both ¡Felicidades! and ¡Felicitaciones! as translations of the interjection, "Congratulations!" What is the difference between the two, and when is each used? Español He ...
1
vote
3answers
3k views

Happy Birthday songs in Spanish [closed]

The most recognized song in the English language is "Happy Birthday to You" (the common song sung on someone's birthday). What songs in Spanish are traditionally sung on birthdays (and what are the ...
3
votes
2answers
2k views

What does “haiga” mean?

What is the Spanish word haiga? Is it a properly conjugated form of a verb? Or a regional variant or improper conjugation? Where/when is it used?
2
votes
1answer
343 views

What is the difference between “por si” and “por si acaso”?

I learned that "just in case" should be translated por si acaso, but I have also heard por si used by itself without the acaso. I believe I've even heard si acaso without the por. What is the ...
2
votes
3answers
739 views

Translation of “I rest my case”

In English, the phrase "I rest my case" can be used in a conversation by one person whose point has just been proven by the other person. In a legal sense, it would mean that a lawyer has concluded ...
5
votes
4answers
3k views

Translation of mild, medium, and hot (food spiciness)

In English, salsa, hot sauce, or other spicy foods are often classified as either mild (not very spicy), medium (moderately spicy), or hot (very spicy). Does Spanish have similar adjectives to ...
2
votes
1answer
2k views

Translation of cord, cable, string, line, thread, rope, etc

In English there are many words describing different kinds of long, skinny, flexible objects: cord line (as in fishing line, clothesline) cable strand lace (as in shoe lace) thread rope string wire ...

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