8
votes
2answers
345 views

¿Qué tipo de palabra es «alto»?

En las intersecciones, es común ver una señal roja y octagonal que dice "alto", el mismo tipo de señal que en inglés dice stop. En inglés, stop es un verbo imperativo, pero no creo que haya un verbo ...
8
votes
1answer
354 views

¿Cómo se describe la temperatura?

Cuando se describe el tiempo, se usa "hace", por ejemplo, "hace frío" o "hace sol". ¿Es lo mismo con la temperatura? Si es la temperatura de algo, como una persona o comida, ¿es lo mismo?
3
votes
2answers
700 views

How outdated is the Spanish of the Reina-Valera Bible?

I've been told by native Spanish speakers that the Reina-Valera Bible (even the 1960 edition) sounds old fashioned and stuffy. It's one of the reasons our pastor uses other translations. But when ...
2
votes
1answer
1k views

Translation of “to be fluent (in a language)”

The literal translation of "to speak a language fluently" would be hablar un idioma con fluidez, but I have heard that means that you speak the language fluidly and smoothly rather than that you have ...
3
votes
2answers
2k views

wallet: cartera vs. billetera

The English word "wallet" (as in something you carry in your pocket to hold money, credit cards, etc.) can be translated into Spanish as cartera or billetera. Are the words synonyms that can be used ...
1
vote
1answer
93 views

holy: santo vs. sagrado

What is the difference between santo and sagrado in translating the English religious word "holy." How are the two words used in religious contexts in Spanish-speaking countries?
5
votes
1answer
98 views

Uses of “SE” : se discutió

Can you see the difference between no. 6 and no. 7? Are there any differences in meaning? Could you please answer the questions below? 6, En el coloquio se discutió un tema interesante. 6a, ...
7
votes
3answers
1k views

Usage of fea and rico

I'm learning Spanish with Rosetta Stone. The lesson I am currently on has two examples that I don't completely understand. La leche está fea El pan está rico "Fea" seems to be translated ...
2
votes
3answers
124 views

Translation of “desarrollo integral”

What is the best English translation for the Spanish phrase desarrollo integral (as applied to a person or country)? "Complete development" doesn't sound right, and I can't find the phrase in my ...
1
vote
2answers
82 views

Translation of “en cierta medida”

What is the best translation of en cierta medida to English? It seems like there are several phrases in English that would work, but I'm not sure which best reflects the sense of the Spanish phrase.
6
votes
1answer
947 views

What is the meaning of “que” and “cual” without an accent mark?

What does "que" and "cual" mean without an accent mark? How do they compare when to each other? How do they compare to their accent-marked form?
3
votes
2answers
552 views

When should I attach the indirect and direct object pronoun to the end of a verb?

I was wondering if you should ever attach the indirect and direct object pronoun to a conjugated verb, and if so, when that would occur? For example, let's say I wanted to convert "La maestra da un ...
2
votes
1answer
160 views

Should I use preterit or imperfect to express something that used to happen repeatedly?

For example, if I wanted to say "They used to travel every day", which would I use: Ellos viajaron cada día. Ellos viajaban cada día.
4
votes
2answers
111 views

Should I include “a” after “conocemos”?

Which would be correct? Nosotros conocemos a los padres de nuestros amigos. Nosotros conocemos los padres de nuestros amigos.
0
votes
1answer
105 views

Need a phrase from a mobile phone application [closed]

I have written a simple application for Android mobiles phones. It appears to be quite popular in a handful of non-English speaking countries, with Spain being one of them. I have managed to get most ...
2
votes
1answer
149 views

Pregunta sobre pronombre: preguntárnoslas

please look at the below sentence: Gabriela no quiere presentarnos a sus amigas. (Gabriela doesn't want to introduce us (DO) to her friends (IO)) where DO is Direct Object and IO is indirect ...
5
votes
5answers
1k views

What is “ya va” in Venezuelan Spanish?

I heard the expression "llava" / "ya va" (?) being used in Venezuelan Spanish. It seems to have the meaning of "wait a moment", but my Mexican friend don't understand it. Does anyone who know what ...
3
votes
5answers
155 views

Translation of 'verbose'

I'm a software developer and I've seen thousands of times the word "verbose" in different tutorials, frameworks, etc. I wonder, which would be the correct translation of the word "verbose" in ...
3
votes
2answers
278 views

Translation of “Who are you writing to”

I've seen the question Who are you writing to? translated in two ways: ¿A quién escribes? and ¿Quién le escribes? The first sentence seems to translate more as To whom do you write?, ...
4
votes
3answers
775 views

Translation of “Take ___ for granted”

I have heard this phrase a lot of times before in forms like: Take (anything) for granted. Don't take (anything) for granted. I'm not sure about how to translate it: Dar (algo) por ...
7
votes
1answer
420 views

¿Cuál es la forma correcta de mencionar un año?(de o del)

Institucionalmente utilizo de para referirme a un año. Ejemplo: 26 de Enero de 2012 Sin embargo, intuitivamente, estoy impulsado a utilizar del en otros contextos. Ejemplo: 26 de Enero del ...
6
votes
4answers
6k views

to drink: beber vs. tomar

I have heard beber and tomar used interchangeably as translations for the English "to drink." Is there any difference between the two, or are they exact synonyms when describing drinking a liquid? Are ...
1
vote
2answers
145 views

waste: desperdiciar vs. malgastar

I learned that "waste" in English can be translated as desperdiciar or malgastar in Spanish. What is the difference between these two words? Are there any cases where one is correct and the other is ...
2
votes
3answers
331 views

Break: romper vs. quebrar vs. quebrantar vs. partir

Off the top of my head, I can think of four Spanish translations for the English verb "to break": romper quebrar quebrantar partir In what cases can each be used, and what are the differences ...
1
vote
1answer
259 views

Translation of “What was your name again?”

In English, if someone has already met someone else but later forgets their name, they might ask them something like, "I'm sorry, what was your name again?" (which is less forceful than a blunt "What ...
1
vote
2answers
786 views

Translating “They don't call me … for nothing.”

In English, there is a phrase "They don't call me ... for nothing." (showing that some nickname someone has has been confirmed by something they just did or are about to do). Is there any equivalent ...
8
votes
3answers
249 views

Two nouns in a row, or, is it OK to omit “de”?

Two or more nouns are sometimes used consecutively, with the second modifying the first. For instance, I recently received a mail whose subject was "Honorarios migración." This is, I suppose, ...
7
votes
1answer
591 views

Where does the alternate meaning for “mateo” come from?

When I was studying Spanish in college the teacher went around the room asking our names and how we had learned the language up to that point. When it came to be my turn I responded with, "Soy ...
3
votes
2answers
1k views

Querer vs Amar & Adorar

The words amar and querer according to RAE are synonyms; however, in Colombia, at least, amar is considered a stronger feeling, a highest level of love, if you can say that. For example, I can tell a ...
7
votes
5answers
2k views

How can we say “I'm sorry” apart from “lo siento”?

So far the only way I know to say "I'm sorry" is "lo siento." However, this gets repetitive rather quickly, and sometimes I'm looking for a stronger form of an apology. What other ways are there to ...
6
votes
3answers
323 views

What's the difference between “estar ansioso de” and “estar ansioso por”?

I know that both 'estar ansioso de' and 'estar ansioso por' mean to be excited for something or looking forward to it, but how do I decide which one to use? Do the two have slightly different ...
1
vote
1answer
2k views

Translation of “take your time”

In English, when making a polite request, it's common to say "take your time" (to tell the other person there's no need to rush). What is the most natural translation of this into Spanish? Is this ...
5
votes
2answers
813 views

Translation of “how often” questions

What is the most idiomatic translation of "how often" into Spanish in questions like: How often do the buses stop here? How often does it rain in November? How often do you get headaches? How often ...
1
vote
2answers
468 views

Words for mountain/hill [closed]

English describes landforms that rise above the surrounding land as "mountains" or "hills." What words in Spanish describe a mountain or a hill? What are the differences between them (i.e. what size ...
3
votes
2answers
283 views

What is the difference between parece and pareciera?

What is the difference between parece que and pareciera que? How are both normally translated? What tenses can be used after pareciera que, and in general how is pareciera used?
3
votes
2answers
623 views

Translation of “thank goodness” or “whew!”

In English, if a bad situation seems imminent but is finally avoided, we might reply with an interjection like "Thank goodness!" or "Whew!". I know "Thank goodness!" has several possible translations ...
3
votes
3answers
256 views

Translation of “settling in”

In English, "to settle in" describes what someone does after moving in to a new place or returning from a long vacation: I just got back, I'm still settling in. We moved last week! It will be ...
2
votes
2answers
441 views

Translation of “It will be a while before/until…”

When explaining that something won't happen soon, English uses expressions like: It will be a while until ... It will be a while before ... It will be a long time until ... It will ...
2
votes
2answers
119 views

Translation of “in a pickle” and related phrases

In English there are several idioms or phrases that describe being in the midst of a very difficult situation: in a pickle in a quandary in a predicament in between a rock and a hard place How ...
2
votes
2answers
2k views

What's the meaning of “me choca” expression?

What's the meaning of the mexican expression "me choca"? Is it used in any other regions? Examples: Me choca que cuando estoy dormido suene el teléfono y me despierte. Me choca tener que ...
2
votes
1answer
136 views

cordura vs sensatez vs juicio vs sabiduría

Other than juicio, which has the additional meaning of a legal trial, these words all have to do with wisdom, judgement, and/or sense, as I understand it. In what ways are they different?
7
votes
1answer
843 views

“Echar” vs “tirar” vs “lanzar” vs “arrojar” vs “disparar” (to throw)

The basic meaning of them all as I understand it is: To throw Disparar seems to pertain exclusively to shooting or throwing something for the sole purpose of harming (maybe to shoot is the best ...
3
votes
1answer
234 views

Why do definitions use 'que' rather than 'lo que'

For example: lector - que lee Why not: lector - lo que lee
4
votes
1answer
90 views

Using female nouns to refer to males, how are adjectives affected?

Here is an English example where someone is referring to a man as a turtle: That turtle is slow. He is angry because he will not win. (calling that man a turtle) In Spanish, the referenced ...
6
votes
1answer
86 views

Reflexive and non-reflexive third person

This English sentence is ambiguous: He ate his food. The word his can refer to the He at the start, or another man. In Spanish: Él comió su comida. Does the ambiguity still remain or does ...
5
votes
1answer
211 views

How do you write task lists in Spanish?

In English: Go to store. Eat dinner. ... How would this be written in Spanish?
2
votes
2answers
896 views

When do two vowels in Spanish form a diphthong? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Rules applied to the separation of syllables Diphthongs (or triphthongs) are sets of two or three vowels that are pronounced as a single syllable as opposed to being ...
2
votes
1answer
220 views

How are “first” and “second” books of the Bible pronounced?

The Bible has several books in multiple parts (e.g. 1 Corintios, 2 Pedro, 3 Juan). How are these books said out loud? For example, is 1 Pedro pronounced Primer de Pedro, Primero de Pedro, Primera de ...
2
votes
3answers
3k views

Ways to express “to get ready” or “to get dressed”

What verbs in Spanish are used to express the concept of "getting ready" or "getting dressed" (for example, before leaving the house to go out to dinner)? I've seen alistarse, arreglarse, prepararse, ...
2
votes
1answer
101 views

What is the verb landarse (to be it in a game of tag)?

In Nicaragua, when children are playing tag, "to be it" is expressed using what is apparently the verb landarse: Pablo se landa. -> Pablo's it. Me lando yo. -> I'm it. I can't find landar ...

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