Significado de una palabra, discusión de su significado según el contexto o vocabulario específico sobre un tema.

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2
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3answers
974 views

How to say “about” as in about page

I have a simple webpage, La ComeBotella that I'm using for a Spanish project. I'm trying to translate the initial English version I debuted with, and I was wondering how to say "about" when talking ...
2
votes
3answers
223 views

“Calzón” vs. “calzoncillos”

Wiktionary tells me both are underwear, calzón for women and calzoncillos for men. However, when I looked up the words on Google images (something I always do with new words to get a better idea of ...
2
votes
2answers
270 views

“Magia” vs “Mágico”: What's the difference?

According to the dictionary, both words mean magic. But there's got to be some difference, even if it's subtle. Is one more to do with wizardry and the other with magic tricks? Or is it something ...
2
votes
3answers
311 views

¡Hay moros en la costa!

I found this in Barron's Spanish-English dictionary and it piqued my interest: It seems like a sure way to get into trouble in the wrong crowd. Do Spanish speakers use this expression?
2
votes
1answer
107 views

Turning a certain age in Spanish

I know tener is the verb used when talking about one’s age. So the following translation makes perfect sense: Tengo treinta años. I am 30 years old. But what if I want to translate the following ...
2
votes
4answers
205 views

gustar: “I like the cat” vs “The cat likes me”

I put this in the google translate page: the cat likes me i like the cat I get back the translation: el gato me gusta me gusta el gato which doesn't look right at all, and sure enough it gets ...
2
votes
1answer
150 views

Alternativas menos negativas a “desafortunadamente”

Estoy escribiendo un correo orientado a negocios. Quiero decir "Desafortunadamente, blah blah blah, porque bleh bleh bleh", con el objetivo de dar a conocer un hecho que no es beneficioso para la otra ...
2
votes
2answers
381 views

Difference between “alentar” and “animar”

"Alentar" and "animar" can both be used to mean "encourage." Are there situations when one is more appropriate over the other? EDIT I've seen this question, but it does not explain satisfactorily the ...
2
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4answers
278 views

“Toma un tiempo” o “lleva un tiempo”, ¿qué suena más natural?

¿Qué suena más natural en castellano, tomar tiempo o llevar tiempo? Una actividad que toma un tiempo considerable en ser desarrollada. Una actividad que lleva un tiempo el ser desarrollada.
2
votes
3answers
504 views

Break: romper vs. quebrar vs. quebrantar vs. partir

Off the top of my head, I can think of four Spanish translations for the English verb "to break": romper quebrar quebrantar partir In what cases can each be used, and what are the differences ...
2
votes
1answer
287 views

Are there other “feminine only” adjectives in Spanish besides “embarazada”?

In most if not all Spanish dictionaries I've checked, embarazada is only ever listed in its feminine form unlike all other adjectives I can think of. Is this semantic because it's considered that ...
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2answers
56 views

How do you say tabloid and broadsheet journalism in Spanish?

What are some examples of tabloid and broadsheet newspapers in Spain? And also does 'la prensa del corazón' refer to tabloid journalism or other forms of journalism?
2
votes
2answers
170 views

Equivalent of “doch” (German) or “jo” (Norwegian) in Spanish dialects

English There's a very useful word in German, Norwegian and other languages that's used to respond to negative questions in a way that the contrary of the question is expressed. Example: - Hast ...
2
votes
2answers
106 views

Por vs para when discussing number of times

Which one would be the preposition of choice when discussing the number of times something happened? Examples: I saw her for the third time. She is visiting me for the first time.
2
votes
4answers
296 views

What does 'examen de grado' mean?

This is with regard to university studies. I can only find references saying it means 'university exam', but I was wondering if it meant 'final exam' or similar.
2
votes
2answers
953 views

What is the difference between “por medio de” and “a través de”?

It seems like a través de and por medio de can often be used to mean the same thing. What is the difference between them, and in what contexts can you only use one or the other?
2
votes
1answer
207 views

Different words for “sign”

Spanish has several words that could be translated "sign" in English: letrero rótulo señal indicio cartel pancarta seña What are the differences between these words? In what situations can each be ...
2
votes
2answers
172 views

Confused over “vacilar”

While browsing a few Spanish language forums today, I came across this: Un amigo y yo estábamos comentando sobre una foto de nosotros en facebook - de hace tiempo... Otro amigo pensaba que ...
2
votes
3answers
201 views

Ring: “anillo” vs “sortija” [closed]

Both translate as ring. Is there a difference in connotation? Or is it just a matter of dialect? To further confuse things, I have even heard anilla and aro!
2
votes
3answers
155 views

¿Cómo se dice «best way»?

Creo que "best way" en inglés es informal. Es una frase para indicar algo con prudencia. Creo que es eso. Pero en español, ¿cómo se dice? Lo siento por mi español, aún no sé mucho. ¡Estoy ...
2
votes
2answers
2k views

What is the Spanish word for cheek?

Is it mejilla or cachete? Are there dialectical differences? If yes, what are they and which word is used in what context?
2
votes
2answers
1k views

Extensión y origen del orto

Últimamente he visto cada vez más extendido en Colombia el término orto para referirse a las partes traseras de una persona. Originalmente lo escuchaba sólo de argentinos. Siempre asumí que venía de ...
2
votes
1answer
133 views

Myspell and different variants of Spanish

This is somewhat computer related as well. If one installs myspell package in Ubuntu, it would download files for Spanish Spanish, and files for e.g. Argentinian Spanish would be just symlinks to it. ...
2
votes
3answers
128 views

Translation of “twang”

In English (at least American English), "twang" is an onomatopoeia describing the sound of a plucked or vibrating string. It also describes a characteristic of that sound (more common in, say, country ...
2
votes
1answer
2k views

Translation of cord, cable, string, line, thread, rope, etc

In English there are many words describing different kinds of long, skinny, flexible objects: cord line (as in fishing line, clothesline) cable strand lace (as in shoe lace) thread rope string wire ...
2
votes
1answer
250 views

“Reclamo” vs. “Reclamación”

Whenever I go to a restaurant I see a Libro de Reclamaciones which I believe it's something like a Book of Complaints. I thought the direct translation of complaint was in fact reclamo or queja. In ...
2
votes
1answer
207 views

justicia: justice and righteousness?

In the Spanish Bible, I believe the English "justice" and "righteousness" are both translated as justicia. Is justicia the only word that can translate both of these terms? Is there any way to know ...
2
votes
2answers
99 views

“Actualmente” vs. “ahora”

Both translate as now. How does one decide which one to use in which context? My understanding is that ahora is more like "right now, at this moment" whereas actualmente has a broader sense such as ...
2
votes
1answer
30 views

“Recato” vs. “modestia” vs. “decencia”

According to my dictionary, modestia means modesty and decencia means decency, whereas recato can mean either. In what cases then would it be preferable to use recato instead of either of the other ...
2
votes
1answer
100 views

“Tratado” vs. “trato”

Dictionaries say both mean treaty or treatment except that tratado also happens to be the past participle of tratar. Other than tratado's meaning as the past participle of tratar, that's the ...
2
votes
1answer
170 views

“aljibe” vs “pozo”: what's the difference?

Both seem to be words for a well or a shaft. Google Images shows similar pictures for both words. So I am confused if there really is any difference between them at all. Is it just a matter of ...
2
votes
1answer
136 views

Can caer mean “fall” as in “fall for” someone (emotionally) like in English?

In English one might say "I have fallen for you". Could this be said in Spanish with caer, e.g. "tu me has caido muy bien"?
2
votes
3answers
112 views

Jugada estratégica

En el fútbol para una jugada a balón parado, preparada por el equipo, ya sabiendo lo que va a hacer cada uno se dice que es una jugada de estrategia. De acuerdo a las definiciones de táctica y ...
2
votes
1answer
498 views

Different words for “servant”

According to Wiktionary, the English "servant" has two meanings: One who serves another, providing help in some manner. (e.g. She is quite the humble servant, the poor in this city owe much to her ...
2
votes
2answers
72 views

Invitacion forzosa

¿Cómo se le llama a una invitación cuando es obligatoria? O sea, mi jefe me envió una invitación a la fiesta de fin de año, pero luego manda un correo donde dice que la asistencia es obligatoria.
2
votes
2answers
58 views

Niebla vs neblina vs bruma

All three seem to mean fog or mist. Is there any regional difference in usage? Or do they actually stand for slightly different things?
2
votes
3answers
2k views

Are there any words in Spanish that are very difficult to translate to English? [closed]

There seem to be many words (especially technical ones) in English that don't directly translate to a single word in Spanish. What about in the other direction: are there any words in Spanish that are ...
2
votes
1answer
108 views

Which Spanish words are most commonly used to describe smells? [closed]

I would like to know how to name different smells in Spanish. In English, for example, we have adjectives like smelly, fishy, sweet, disgusting, stinky, rotten,etc (actually mainly for bad smells). ...
2
votes
0answers
721 views

Suffixes used to transform an adjective into a noun [closed]

Spanish has, to my knowledge, more possible suffixes than for example English or German. Many adjectives can be transformed into nouns by adding -ness, -ism, -ity in English, or -keit, -heit, -ismus ...
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vote
5answers
158 views

Spanish for “link”

While listening to a podcast from SpanishPod recently, I came across this section where they were discussing the Spanish for various computer-related terms and one of the hosts gave liga as the ...
1
vote
2answers
144 views

Translating “wise” (not referring to a person, e.g. “wise decision”)

As I understand it, wise is normally translated as sabio when referring to a person. What about when not referring to a person? For example: I don't think that would be a very wise decision. ...
1
vote
3answers
287 views

“Lucha” vs “Pelea”: what's the difference?

The dictionary translates both as fight or struggle. Is there any subtle difference in usage or context, or is it just a matter of personal choice? Which of the two is preferred in Latin America ...
1
vote
4answers
813 views

How can I translate/describe a “rough idle” to the mechanic?

I need to take my vehicle to a mechanic to diagnose a problem with a rough idle. How do I translate this term, "rough idle" to Spanish?
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4answers
529 views

¿Se puede utilizar 'molesto' en el sentido de enfermedad?

Quiero decir: estoy molesto, me duele la cabeza. ¿Tiene sentido?
1
vote
1answer
224 views

plan: plano vs. plan

The English "plan" can be translated into Spanish as plan or plano. What is the difference between plan and plano, and when would each one be used?
1
vote
1answer
329 views

Efficient: eficiente vs. eficaz

The English "efficient" can be translated as either eficiente or eficaz in Spanish. What is the difference between these two translations? In what situations can each be used?
1
vote
4answers
138 views

Translation of “can”

I know can is poder in Spanish. But generally it would indicate the ability to do something rather than the permission. You cannot drink. No puedo beber. The above sentence could imply: 1) ...
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4answers
688 views

Ser vs estar in this sentence

The sentence I want to translate is: The wine cellar should be dark and dry. Which of the following would be more appropriate and why? La bodega debe ser oscura y seca. La bodega debe estar oscura ...
1
vote
3answers
159 views

Ordinary, regular, run-of-the-mill, average, etc

In English, there are a lot of ways to express that someone or something is standard and not particularly special or extraordinary. For example: Ordinary people like you and me can sometimes ...
1
vote
4answers
101 views

Spanish for “file”

I have come across fichero and archivo although the latter seems more ubiquitous. Is there any difference in usage? Or is it just a matter of personal preference? Also, if archivo is file, what's the ...