1
vote
4answers
122 views

Translation of “can”

I know can is poder in Spanish. But generally it would indicate the ability to do something rather than the permission. You cannot drink. No puedo beber. The above sentence could imply: 1) ...
0
votes
2answers
100 views

“A menudo” vs “frecuentemente”

Dictionary says both mean often. Which one is a better way to say often in Spanish in day to day conversations? If there are regional variations, I would like to know what Mexicans prefer.
5
votes
4answers
128 views

How do you say “senior agent” in spanish?

As in more "experienced" customer service agent
5
votes
3answers
330 views

Plátano and banana, geographical differences?

I don't really speak Spanish, but I do know a few words and phrases here and there, and enjoy furthering what little knowledge I have. So, today I saw, in a Swedish newspaper, a reference to plantains ...
2
votes
1answer
120 views

Alternativas menos negativas a “desafortunadamente”

Estoy escribiendo un correo orientado a negocios. Quiero decir "Desafortunadamente, blah blah blah, porque bleh bleh bleh", con el objetivo de dar a conocer un hecho que no es beneficioso para la otra ...
1
vote
1answer
108 views

Duda sobre “escuálido” en el pronunciamiento de un Ministro

Viendo este pronunciamiento del Ministro de Educación de Venezuela http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BKW8nloZAqQ en el 00:18 el dice estas palabras no es que vamos a sacar la gente de la pobreza, ...
5
votes
4answers
323 views

Si británico se refiere a lo natural del Reino Unido, ¿cuál es el gentilicio para lo estrictamente de Gran Bretaña?

Dice la RAE.es: británico, ca. (Del lat. Britannĭcus). adj. Perteneciente o relativo a la antigua Britania, sur de la Gran Bretaña. adj. Natural del Reino Unido de Gran Bretaña e Irlanda ...
3
votes
1answer
116 views

How do you use “alguna que otra cosa” in context?

How do you use "alguna que otra cosa" in context? What does this phrase mean?
5
votes
3answers
638 views

¿Que significan esas palabras en el español de Colombia?

Me quedé asombrado al leer el libro Buscando dentro del Caos escrito por César Pellicer, particularmente desde sus frases abundantes en palabras totalmente misteriosas para mí. Por ejemplo: ...
2
votes
2answers
305 views

Difference between “alentar” and “animar”

"Alentar" and "animar" can both be used to mean "encourage." Are there situations when one is more appropriate over the other? EDIT I've seen this question, but it does not explain satisfactorily the ...
1
vote
4answers
268 views

¿Se puede utilizar 'molesto' en el sentido de enfermedad?

Quiero decir: estoy molesto, me duele la cabeza. ¿Tiene sentido?
-1
votes
2answers
134 views

Exact meaning of “natural de” in a curriculum vitae?

In a Spanish-language curriculum vitae, I came across the item Natural de:, which I don't understand. It is in the "Personal Data" section (Datos personales).
4
votes
1answer
143 views

'Controlar' en lenguaje formal

En el Metro de Madrid, así como en otros lugares en España, aconsejan al usuario por megafonía que "Controle sus pertenencias en todo momento, por su seguridad." Me da la impresión de que Controlar, ...
4
votes
2answers
152 views

Spanish words for “loop”

I was recently reading a review of a Spanish-English dictionary that picked "loop" as a good example of a word with many possible translations into Spanish. I looked around and found several ...
12
votes
4answers
11k views

How do you differentiate between walnuts and pecans in Spanish?

It recently occurred to me that the Spanish nuez can be translated to English as both "walnut" and "pecan." Is the same word really used for both types of nuts? How would you specify which nut you're ...
5
votes
3answers
208 views

¿Cómo se usa la forma femenina de tema?

He leído que la palabra tema se puede usar en la forma femenina: la tema. ¿Qué significa la tema, y cómo se usa? ¿Es común? ¿Cuál es la diferencia entre el tema y la tema?
6
votes
5answers
7k views

¿Cuál es la diferencia entre “formación” y “capacitación”?

Estoy escribiendo con mi amiga de Argentina, y ella me habló de su nuevo trabajo. Ella dijo que tenía que tomar un curso de capacitación, pero veo la palabra "formación" en lugar a veces. ¿Cuál es ...
5
votes
3answers
194 views

“Earthquake”: When to use “temblor” and “terremoto”

When referring to an earthquake, are temblor and terremoto perfect synonyms? Are there any differences?
9
votes
2answers
658 views

What is the spanish translation for “Account” when referring to a user account on a website?

The English > Spanish translation of account on Google Translate comes up with various forms of the word cuenta. However, the Spanish > English translation of cuenta returns words relating to ...
12
votes
3answers
2k views

What is the difference between “personas” and “gente”?

I was translating a sentence for school en Español and I came across the word "people." I looked it up on Google Translate and it gave me "personas" and also "gente." What is the difference between ...
3
votes
2answers
149 views

Translation for the adjective “haunting” (as in “a haunting melody”)

What is the best Spanish translation for the English adjective "haunting" (as in "a haunting melody")? WordReference gives three options: evocador, inquietante and inolvidable. Do any of these really ...
9
votes
5answers
424 views

Best way to translate 'uneducated', meaning lacking formal schooling

Generally the Spanish word maleducado more often means rude, rather than unschooled. In light of this, how would one describe someone who is polite and intelligent, but has never been formally ...
8
votes
1answer
2k views

What's the difference between “sólo”, “únicamente” and “solamente”?

According to the RAE: solo o sólo. adv. m. Únicamente, solamente. In what situations is preferred to use one over the other? Are they interchangeable? Sólo es una pregunta ...
6
votes
2answers
203 views

What is the difference between requerir and exigir?

I believe that they both mean to "require." But do they refer to different "degrees" (urgencies) or types of requirments? Can they be used interchangeably or is one more suitable in some contexts and ...
9
votes
2answers
336 views

Is “versus” a Spanish word?

RAE says no, wordreference says yes. Is it used or understood by the Spanish speakers?
5
votes
2answers
2k views

forever: por siempre vs. para siempre

I have seen "forever" translated as both por siempre and para siempre. What is the difference? Are there contexts where you must use one or the other?
3
votes
3answers
378 views

Translating “Help!” (interjection)

In English, if there is any kind of emergency or urgent assistance needed, we use the interjection, "Help!" In Spanish I've seen several: ¡Socorro! ¡Auxilio! ¡Ayuda! or ¡Ayúdame! Which of these is ...
6
votes
3answers
384 views

feliz vs. alegre vs. dichoso

I recently heard dichoso used to mean feliz. Looking up dichoso in a dictionary shows it means "happy" (or "blessed"). What is the difference between dichoso, feliz, and alegre to mean "happy"? Are ...
3
votes
1answer
344 views

Words for “to encourage”: alentar, animar, fomentar

In English, "to encourage" seems to have at least two uses: to suggest that someone should do something (e.g. "He encouraged me to find a new guitar teacher.") to give confidence or hope to someone ...
3
votes
4answers
45k views

congratulations: felicidades vs. felicitaciones

English I have heard both ¡Felicidades! and ¡Felicitaciones! as translations of the interjection, "Congratulations!" What is the difference between the two, and when is each used? Español He ...
2
votes
1answer
2k views

Translation of cord, cable, string, line, thread, rope, etc

In English there are many words describing different kinds of long, skinny, flexible objects: cord line (as in fishing line, clothesline) cable strand lace (as in shoe lace) thread rope string wire ...
1
vote
1answer
360 views

Translation of “to wind (a rope, hose, string, cord, etc.)”

The other questions about "wind" got me thinking about it's normal verb use. To "wind" something is to wrap it in circles, either around an object or simply making a coil. For this use, it looks like ...
7
votes
3answers
2k views

Usage of fea and rico

I'm learning Spanish with Rosetta Stone. The lesson I am currently on has two examples that I don't completely understand. La leche está fea El pan está rico "Fea" seems to be translated ...
2
votes
3answers
346 views

Break: romper vs. quebrar vs. quebrantar vs. partir

Off the top of my head, I can think of four Spanish translations for the English verb "to break": romper quebrar quebrantar partir In what cases can each be used, and what are the differences ...
2
votes
3answers
4k views

Ways to express “to get ready” or “to get dressed”

What verbs in Spanish are used to express the concept of "getting ready" or "getting dressed" (for example, before leaving the house to go out to dinner)? I've seen alistarse, arreglarse, prepararse, ...
3
votes
3answers
1k views

challenge: desafío vs. reto

The English word "challenge" can be translated to Spanish as desafío (desafiar) or reto (retar). Is there any difference between these words, or are they exact synonyms? If there is a difference, when ...
2
votes
1answer
160 views

justicia: justice and righteousness?

In the Spanish Bible, I believe the English "justice" and "righteousness" are both translated as justicia. Is justicia the only word that can translate both of these terms? Is there any way to know ...
0
votes
1answer
2k views

Words for boat, ship, and other seafaring vessels

In English, we have many words to describe the different types of vessels that travel on water: boat ship yacht dinghy canoe kayak raft watercraft vessel sailboat barge catamaran lifeboat/liferaft ...
5
votes
4answers
131 views

Usage of the word acullá

WordReference translates acullá as "yonder." Is this a word that was only used in the past, or is it still used in modern Spanish today? If so, what regions does it appear in and how is it used?
11
votes
4answers
2k views

How can I distinguish between “girlfriend,” “fiancée” and “bride”, which are all “novia”?

I am a native Portuguese speaker, where noiva means "bride" or "fiancée." So I was very confused when someone asked me if a girl was my novia, since she didn't have an engagement ring (thank goodness ...
7
votes
3answers
2k views

Age range of niño, chico, muchacho, joven, etc

Spanish has several words for referring to children: niño/niña chico/chica muchacho/muchacha joven Some dialects add others like chavo or chavalo. What are the approximate age ranges these words ...
5
votes
2answers
202 views

Matutino and Vespertino

I see matutino and vespertino, meaning morning and afternoon, used to describe parts of the daily schedule in schools and church. They sound very formal. Are there more words like them to describe ...