Parte de la oración que expersa la acción o movimiento. Words mostly about actions which can be conjugated to indicate person, number, tense, mood, etc.

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Translation of “to catch up” (sharing recent happenings with someone you haven't seen lately)

In English, "to catch up (with each other)" can be used to describe two people that haven't seen each other in a while that are sharing recent events in their lives with each other. For example: "I ...
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4answers
791 views

Present subjunctive in vos form

What is the rule for conjugating verbs in the vos form in the present subjunctive? If it varies by region, what are the differences?
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145 views

If soy and eres mean “I am” and “you are”, when should you use “yo soy” and “tú eres”? [duplicate]

Knowing that verbs imply the subject (unlike English), when is it necessary to be redundant and use the subject? I gathered that it is only used at the beginning of a conversation, but I'm not sure. ...
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427 views

Why does “mostrar a” mean “to show” and not “to show to”?

Tengo una biblia bilingüe. En el 14 capítulo de Juan, cuenta así una conversación entre Jesús y uno de su discípulos: --Señor-- dijo Felipe--, muéstranos al Padre y con eso nos basta. ...
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1answer
72 views

If you need to clarify a speaker with a pronoun, do you need to clarify all verbs in the sentence with one?

The following is ambiguous: Mientras era feliz, eres cansado y era triste. If you want to clarifiy speakers by adding pronouns to the verbs, would you have to do it to all them, or only until ...
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4answers
694 views

Why is there a “se” after the verb in “llevarse los libros a casa”?

The sentence comes from an exercise in my Spanish text book: ¿Pueden los lectores llevarse los libros a casa si quieren? In the above sentence, there's a "se" after the verb "llevar". But I think ...
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1answer
213 views

Second person singluar imperative of a reflexive verb ending in a diphthong

The question is pretty much in the title. If I have the verb lavarse, I know to make the imperative I use lávate. But what to do with a verb like afeitarse? Is it afeitate? My spellcheck thinks ...
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2answers
3k views

What does “haiga” mean?

What is the Spanish word haiga? Is it a properly conjugated form of a verb? Or a regional variant or improper conjugation? Where/when is it used?
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3answers
336 views

Translation of “settling in”

In English, "to settle in" describes what someone does after moving in to a new place or returning from a long vacation: I just got back, I'm still settling in. We moved last week! It will be ...
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8answers
666 views

Voy vs. Vengo, both correct?

So I have a doubt. I was talking with a cousin and I said: Entonces de pronto vengo en enero. And he said, isn't it voy ? I thought about it and I think that both are correct. Am I wrong?
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228 views

Using embedded pronouns inside verbs [duplicate]

So, I'm in Spanish 1, and I've heard that pronouns (Yo, tu, el, etc.) are embedded in conjugated verbs. I've noticed the use of a separate pronoun along with a conjugated verb, and it seems a little ...
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263 views

¿“Espero que hagas algo” o “espero hagas algo”?

¿Cuál es la forma correcta de utilizar este juego de verbos transitivos? "Espero que hagas como te ordeno". "Espero hagas como te ordeno". Es sólo un ejemplo pero tengo la duda porque la ...
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3answers
104 views

El uso de «se» en «se llevó los niños a rezar»

¿Qué significa el se en esta frase? Siempre didáctico, hizo [Melquíades] una sabia exposición sobre las virtudes diabólicas del cinabrio. Úrsula no le hizo caso, sino que se llevó los niños a ...
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2answers
16k views

When is “me encanta” romantic?

I have heard that me gusta usually has a romantic connotation when referring to people (as opposed to just saying that you get along well with someone). What about me encanta? Does it always have ...
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2answers
155 views

Meaning of “en + infinitive” in “en explorar”

What is this phrase en explorar in the following sentence? Los primeros europeos en explorar la región del actual Illinois fueron misioneros franceses. I would have thought you would say que ...
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4answers
723 views

How is the second person singular formed with rioplatense “vos”?

English I learned my Spanish in Spain, some years ago. Now I am visiting Uruguay and Argentina and coming across the usage of the pronoun vos, and its corresponding different formation of the second ...
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2answers
809 views

When do you not conjugate verbs?

One of my homework assignments asks the following questions, and I'm wondering why the verbs aren't conjugated. ¿Vivir en el desierto o vivir en el centro de una ciudad grande? ¿Tener una ...
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1answer
76 views

What is the difference between «pensar en» and just «pensar»?

I feel like I should know the answer to this by now, and/or that it should have been asked here, but I can't find it. I was recently looking at some example sentences (I think linked from another ...
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2answers
191 views

Verbs ending in -ed

What kind of conjugation is it when a verb ends in "-ed", such as "tened," "ved," or "coged" What does it make the word mean/ how is it used (in what context)? (Just for the record, I've seen this ...
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2answers
72 views

how does one translate “smoking meat”?

I was trying to express, "I smoked some pork spare ribs this past weekend," in Spanish. I tried looking up smoking meats in the Spanish dictionary and often I get fumar (to smoke), asar (bbq), or ...
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2answers
158 views

Antiquated uses of haber

Today, someone told me that haber can be used to indicate possession, apparently because in early Spanish haber was used to mean tener. They gave the specific example of: Hemos un bocadillo (We have ...
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2answers
311 views

What is the difference between parece and pareciera?

What is the difference between parece que and pareciera que? How are both normally translated? What tenses can be used after pareciera que, and in general how is pareciera used?
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681 views

esperar: wait vs. hope vs. expect

The verb esperar (e.g. Estoy esperándolo.) can be used in at least three senses: to wait for to hope to expect In English, these all mean very different things: I'm waiting for you to ...
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2answers
107 views

Which of these expressions is correct? “Debe ser” vs “Debe de ser” [duplicate]

I have always had this doubt. Which of these expressions is properly used and when to use each of them? Debe haber sido un accidente Debe de haber sido un accidente (is this a mistake?)
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In this situation, would “saber de” or “conocer” be the better option?

I'm trying to say "it's obvious that he is familiar with their culture..." I know conocer is to be familiar with, but would that work in this situation? I've also heard that "saber de" is another ...
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2answers
461 views

How do you differenciate “remember” and “remind”?

I used Google to translate "remember" and "remind". Both came out to be recordar. Why is there no distinction made? You can only remember something by youself, but you have to remind someone else of ...
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1answer
113 views

Difference between 'podría estar' and 'estaría'

This question could apply to a number of verbs I guess, including: podría ser OR sería podría hablar OR hablaría podría comer OR comería Which could be generalised as 'conditional ...
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1answer
909 views

se pronoun in “no fault constructions”

One page I recently ran across discusses the concept of "no fault constructions" or verbs that use se in such a way to describe an action as taking place apart from the person who caused the action. ...
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1answer
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“pensando en ti” vs. “pensando de ti” vs. “pensándote”

When using the verb pensar to describe thinking about a person, there are at least three options: Estoy pensando en ti. Estoy pensando de ti. Estoy pensándote. What are the differences between ...
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136 views

Subject - Verb Agreement: Repitiendo…, y determinando, ilustra

Repitiendo este proceso muchas veces, y determinando la proporción de éxitos para cada muestra, ilustra la idea de la variabilidad de muestra a muestra en la proporción muestral. Should ilustra or ...
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4answers
392 views

¿Cuándo se usa “libertar”, y cuando “liberar”? ¿Qué diferencias hay entre las dos palabras?

¿Cuándo es mas apropiado usar "liberar" o "libertar"? ¿Qué diferencias hay entre las dos? Connotan algo distinto? Por ejemplo, Él los libertó de la esclavitud [o] Él los liberó de la esclavitud ...
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2answers
69 views

No se acumulan vs No están acumulados

Ejemplo: Los permisos no se acumulan durante la configuración. En inglés está bien dicho The permissions are not accumulated during the configuration, o por el contrario lo que estoy diciendo con ...
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0answers
58 views

Verbos en pasado que tienen una “s” extra al final [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “s” final en tiempo pretérito: -aste(s), -iste(s) He visto que en algunos países, especialmente centroamericanos, terminan los verbos en segunda persona ...
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3answers
220 views

What is the correct verb for temporary/transient color?

Color, generally, is ascribed with ser. In the mental model I'm assembling as I learn Spanish, this seems to be because it is, generally, a durable characteristic. El cielo es azul - the sky is blue. ...
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3answers
6k views

Ways to express “to get ready” or “to get dressed”

What verbs in Spanish are used to express the concept of "getting ready" or "getting dressed" (for example, before leaving the house to go out to dinner)? I've seen alistarse, arreglarse, prepararse, ...
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2answers
204 views

“Hable con ella”

I'm referring to Almodóvar's picture. And I've been wondering: 2nd person imperative of the verb hablar is habla. hable is the 3rd person imperative form. Why is he using a 3rd person here. As if ...
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2answers
289 views

How to say “To tend to”

How do I say "to tend to" as in: I tend to rant a little bit when I'm tired. She tends to forget what she came into the room for. etc. Maybe I should just use 'a veces', 'siempre', etc.?
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1answer
448 views

iba a + infinitivo con valor de condicional

En las oraciones: No pense que iba a volver a verte. Todos sabiamos que iba a fallar. iba a + infinitivo puede ser reemplazado por el condicional del infinitivo, como en: No pense que ...
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1answer
197 views

Subject-Verb Agreement “Estudiar y trabajar resulta…”

In English: Studying and working at the same time always result in a big challenge. In Spanish: Estudiar y trabajar al mismo tiempo siempre resulta un gran desafío. Why is the singular form of ...
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3answers
156 views

Why would you ever say “el vino está delicioso”?

I'm doing a Spanish beginner course on Memrise and one flashcard asks for the translation of "The wine is delicious". The suggested translation uses estar. I understand that ser expresses a permanent ...
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1answer
59 views

¿Es correcto el uso del verbo en “Eres tú y los demás.”?

A pesar que se refiere a varias personas (tú y los demás), no he escuchado que se diga Son tú y los demás. (o "Sois tú y los demás", atendiendo a diferencias regionales) ¿Es eso correcto? ...
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3answers
204 views

Exactly what type of a word is “véase”?

I see the words véase and véanse somewhat frequently. I understand they are used like this: See page 5 Véase página 5 And See pages 5 and 6 Véanse páginas 5 y 6 ...
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1answer
182 views

Should I use preterit or imperfect to express something that used to happen repeatedly?

For example, if I wanted to say "They used to travel every day", which would I use: Ellos viajaron cada día. Ellos viajaban cada día.
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1answer
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Difference between some verbs and pronomial forms of the verb with the same translation

SpanishDict translates some verbs and their pronomial forms (+de, +a, etc.) as the same thing. Off the top of my head: Escapar - to escape Escaparse de - to escape Olvidar - to forget ...
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1answer
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Speakers' location in determining venir vs. ir

In English, we use the word "come" very loosely (at least in day-to-day spoken English): Want to come over to my place later? Can I come over to your house for New Years'? Can you come meet me at ...
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2answers
159 views

Meaning of verb form 'es algo que *inhiere* en ellas'

In the following sentence: advertimos que la forma accidental que configura al bronce como estatua o a la madera como silla es algo que inhiere en ellas, que se encuentra en esa materia como en ...
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1answer
1k views

¿Debo utilizar «decirle» o «decirles»?

Estoy redactando un documento de adiestramiento y me encuentro con una duda sobre el uso de esta palabra. La oración es la siguiente: La idea es decirle a los integrantes qué se les va a presentar ...
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1answer
48 views

What are these words “hances” and “deshances” in a proverb common on the Internet?

A friend of mine just showed me this Spanish proverb, which is some equivalent to English "shirtsleeves to shirtsleeves in three generations". "Quien no lo tiene, lo hance; y quien lo tiene, lo ...
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3answers
96 views

Multiple verbs with different agents

When a sentence contains two verbs with different agents must they be separated by a conjunction (e.g. que)? Or, can the second verb be in the infinitive? For example, in the following sentence the ...
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1answer
390 views

Most common verbs

I am a spanish learner and I figured out that I really need to learn the verbs. Is there a good (preferably online) resource with let's say the 100 most common verbs and conjugation to get me started. ...