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2
votes
3answers
120 views

Existe un análogo de “as of (yesterday)” en español?

En inglés, la construcción "as of" es más o menos equivalente a "desde" o "a partir de", pero los usos no coinciden exactamente. En particular, frases como The website was down as of last Monday ...
0
votes
1answer
84 views

Is the spanish 'YA' synonymous of 'already' and 'yet' without exceptions? [closed]

'Ya estas alli' means 'you are already there' But: 'Ya estas alli?' means 'Are you there yet? Another example: It would be wrong to say 'Ya no' when trying to mean 'Not yet; The translation of ...
2
votes
1answer
162 views

Past or future neutral time difference — does my sentence make sense?

"Que es de 1 año, 2 meses, 16 días, 1 minuto, y 15 segundas a partir de ahora." Does that accurately translate to: "That is 1 year, 2 months, 16 days, 1 minute, and 15 seconds from now"? ...
3
votes
1answer
292 views

“Ir a” versus future tense when asking a question

I've read that one should use "ir a" when time of completion is certain. If the time is uncertain, one should use the future tense. This choice is not so clear-cut when asking a question. Take for ...
6
votes
3answers
138 views

Indicative and subjunctive after time constructions

I have a few questions regarding the use of some verbs after time constructions like "tan pronto como" or "en cuanto." If I am saying.... Los domingos por la mañana vemos televisión. Tan pronto ...
3
votes
2answers
175 views

Why is “missing” added to waiting in Spanish?

In Perú we say "me falta esperar 10 minutos", in United States we do not say "I am missing waiting 10 minutes". Why is "falta/missing" added in Peruvian Spanish? Or conversely, why in American English ...
5
votes
2answers
88 views

Translation of “How far back?” in the context of time

How would I say "How far back do they want me to go?" The context of the question is that I was filling out an application where they wanted my work history. I was attempting to ask the person ...
6
votes
2answers
119 views

How to refer to a specific decade in Spanish? eg. the 1960's

In English, when you want to refer to a specific decade you simply pluralize the year: the nineteen-sixties (written 1960's) OR the nineteen-tens (written 1910's) Granted, referring to the first ...
1
vote
1answer
3k views

Spanish abbreviations of days of the week

In English, the days of the week have single-letter abbreviations (M, T, W, etc.) and three-letter abbreviations (Mon., Tue., Wed.). What are the standard ways to abbreviate the days of the week in ...
8
votes
2answers
38k views

When is it appropriate to say “buenos días”?

It looks like "buenos días" is most commonly translated as "good morning," although apparently it can mean "good day" as well (like a literal translation would suggest). Is it appropriate to greet ...
4
votes
2answers
1k views

Translating “How long does it take to get from <here> to <there>?”

What is the most natural and common way to ask how much time it takes to get from one location to another? For example: How long does it take to get from Guadalajara to Mexico City? How long does it ...
9
votes
4answers
5k views

Use of AM/PM in time

Aside from using 'military time' (19:00 for 7:00 PM), is there another approach to delineate between AM/PM time in Spanish?
5
votes
2answers
202 views

Matutino and Vespertino

I see matutino and vespertino, meaning morning and afternoon, used to describe parts of the daily schedule in schools and church. They sound very formal. Are there more words like them to describe ...