Determining the best possible word to express a concept among several choices.

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2answers
1k views

What is the rule for cualquier, cualquiera, and cualesquiera?

I remember learning the rule for when to use cualquier, cualquiera, and cualesquiera, but was always confused about the exact differences. When should each be used, and what role do number, gender, ...
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4answers
2k views

“It was great to see you”

What is the most natural translation of the English phrase "It was great to see you" (as in what you would say after seeing a friend you hadn't seen for a long time)?
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4answers
100 views

Are the phrases “jarabe para la tos” or “antibióticos” colloquially used to mean other types of medicine?

My spanish textbook says that if you have a fever, you should take "jarabe para la tos". It also recommends "antibióticos" as a remedy for "la gripe". The glossary translates these phrases as "cough ...
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2answers
1k views

wallet: cartera vs. billetera

The English word "wallet" (as in something you carry in your pocket to hold money, credit cards, etc.) can be translated into Spanish as cartera or billetera. Are the words synonyms that can be used ...
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2answers
2k views

Translation of “Are you ok?” or “Are you alright?”

What is the best Spanish translation of the English phrase "Are you ok?" or "Are you alright?" (said out of concern for someone who has just gotten hurt, for example after tripping and falling or ...
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5answers
189 views

“¿De qué color es la camisa?” - What is “De” for?

It looks like this sentence can be formed without the "De" so what is it for?
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2answers
680 views

Translating “They don't call me … for nothing.”

In English, there is a phrase "They don't call me ... for nothing." (showing that some nickname someone has has been confirmed by something they just did or are about to do). Is there any equivalent ...
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1answer
163 views

plan: plano vs. plan

The English "plan" can be translated into Spanish as plan or plano. What is the difference between plan and plano, and when would each one be used?
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1answer
615 views

Translation of “too good to be true”

In English, we say something is "too good to be true" to express that apparently amazing deals or benefits generally aren't real. Is there an equivalent phrase in Spanish?
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1answer
210 views

Efficient: eficiente vs. eficaz

The English "efficient" can be translated as either eficiente or eficaz in Spanish. What is the difference between these two translations? In what situations can each be used?
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2answers
188 views

Spanish words for cap, cover, lid, etc

What Spanish words can be used to describe a cap, cover, lid, or top (in other words, something placed on top of something, usually to close an opening)? What is the difference between tapa and tapón? ...
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3answers
3k views

Translation of “llevar a cabo”

What does the Spanish phrase llevar a cabo mean in English? What are the most common translations of the phrase into English?
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1answer
2k views

How should “have been” be translated?

I often use the phrase "have been" (or "has been") in English in sentences like: It has been raining a lot recently. I have been thinking about the exam all week. It's been a long time since I've ...
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4answers
100 views

gustar: “I like the cat” vs “The cat likes me”

I put this in the google translate page: the cat likes me i like the cat I get back the translation: el gato me gusta me gusta el gato which doesn't look right at all, and sure enough it gets ...
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2answers
81 views

Translation of “en cierta medida”

What is the best translation of en cierta medida to English? It seems like there are several phrases in English that would work, but I'm not sure which best reflects the sense of the Spanish phrase.
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2answers
120 views

Insect bites vs. stings

In English, some insects bite you (like mosquitos), while other insects sting you (like bees). A bite generally involves an animal's mouth, while a sting involves another part of the animal (a bee's ...
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2answers
3k views

Translation of “What's wrong?”

What is the most natural translation of the English phrase, "What's wrong?" (i.e. what you would ask a person who appears sad or hurt or withdrawn)? ¿Qué te pasó? would be one option, but that seems ...
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1answer
589 views

Translating “how is …?” and “how was …?”

What are the options for translating the phrase "how is" or "how was," as in: How's the steak? How is your day so far? How is the traffic today? and How was your vacation? How was the meeting? ...
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1answer
361 views

Synonyms for big (grande), as in volume?

I'm trying to find a proper synonym for "grande", as in the quality of three dimensional objects of occupying space, to use with a regular object, such as a "big dog". I'll explain my specific ...
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3answers
288 views

Break: romper vs. quebrar vs. quebrantar vs. partir

Off the top of my head, I can think of four Spanish translations for the English verb "to break": romper quebrar quebrantar partir In what cases can each be used, and what are the differences ...
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2answers
244 views

“although” vs. “even though” vs. “though”

In English, there are three conjunctions that are very similar: although even though though Is aunque the only possible translation of these to Spanish, or are there similar synonyms in Spanish as ...
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2answers
376 views

Words for mountain/hill [closed]

English describes landforms that rise above the surrounding land as "mountains" or "hills." What words in Spanish describe a mountain or a hill? What are the differences between them (i.e. what size ...
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1answer
5k views

Translating “kind words” (as in “Thank you for your kind words.”)

In English if someone complements you or expresses their gratitude for something you've done, you can respond with something like, "Thank you for your kind words." What Spanish phrase would best ...
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2answers
110 views

Translation of “to play favorites”

What is the best Spanish translation of the English idiom "to play favorites" (as in favoring individuals in a group instead of treating everyone equally)?
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1answer
604 views

Speakers' location in determining venir vs. ir

In English, we use the word "come" very loosely (at least in day-to-day spoken English): Want to come over to my place later? Can I come over to your house for New Years'? Can you come meet me at ...
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3answers
926 views

Translating “to be excited to…”

What is the best way to translate sentences like: I'm so excited to see you next week! He's really excited about graduation. We're excited to have you come visit for Christmas. Do emocionado and ...
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2answers
83 views

When should one use “para” for the English word “to”?

This is an extension of the question What is the difference between using "de" and "que" for the English word "to"? Consider the sentence "You have one minute to ...
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1answer
88 views

Duda sobre “escuálido” en el pronunciamiento de un Ministro

Viendo este pronunciamiento del Ministro de Educación de Venezuela http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BKW8nloZAqQ en el 00:18 el dice estas palabras no es que vamos a sacar la gente de la pobreza, ...
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4answers
1k views

Spanish words for cake, pie, pastry, etc

English has several specific words for different types of sweet, baked products: cake pie pastry tart torte cobbler Does Spanish have the same level of detail for describing these sweets? What ...
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4answers
120 views

¿Mejor manera de decir: “como parte de”?

Quiero decirle a alguien algo como: "como parte de nuestros estudios..." "ayudado por nuestros estudios..." "para complementar y mejorar nuestros estudios..." "en el cuadro de nuestros estudios" ...
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2answers
276 views

Translating “shrewd” (as in “a shrewd businessman”)

The English word "shrewd" (as in "a shrewd businessman") describes someone who is sharp, clever, crafty, or cunning. For example, a shrewd businessman might come up with a coupon offer that seems ...
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2answers
79 views

Difference between “susto” and “aprensión”

Del susto y la aprensión, el rujido ha cesado. What are the differences between "susto" and "aprensión"? Both mean fear, no? Or they have different degrees of fear?
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2answers
130 views

waste: desperdiciar vs. malgastar

I learned that "waste" in English can be translated as desperdiciar or malgastar in Spanish. What is the difference between these two words? Are there any cases where one is correct and the other is ...
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1answer
2k views

Translation of “take your time”

In English, when making a polite request, it's common to say "take your time" (to tell the other person there's no need to rush). What is the most natural translation of this into Spanish? Is this ...
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1answer
315 views

Indicative vs. subjunctive in “no importa qué dice el destino”

If I'm hearing it correctly, there's a line in Carlos Baute's "Colgando En Tus Manos" that says: No importa qué dice el destino. I thought that sentence should be expressed: No importa qué ...
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1answer
88 views

holy: santo vs. sagrado

What is the difference between santo and sagrado in translating the English religious word "holy." How are the two words used in religious contexts in Spanish-speaking countries?
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1answer
521 views

What are some terms of endearment for a girlfriend/wife? [closed]

What are some Spanish terms of enderment you could use for a girlfriend or a wife? In English I'm thinking things like sweetheart, sweetie, darling, cutie, babe, etc.. Any others that are unique to ...
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3answers
139 views

Difference between “salvo” and “salvado” (religion)

For expressing the religious concept of being "saved," what is the difference between salvo and salvado? Is there any difference in connotation or formality of the two words? Are there any contexts ...
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4answers
209 views
0
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3answers
89 views

Is it “Tú juegas como el” or “Tú juegas como él”? [closed]

The sentence says "You play as him" but all of the choices have the last word as el instead of él. I believe "Tú juegas como él" to be the right choice, is that correct?
0
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3answers
216 views

What is the best way to refer to those of Spanish descent or language?

In English there are several ways to refer to people who speak Spanish or are from a Spanish-speaking country: Hispanic, Latin, Latino, Chicano, Spanish-speaking, etc. What equivalent terms exist in ...
0
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1answer
172 views

caja vs. cajón vs. estuche

"Box" in English can be translated into Spanish as caja, cajón, or estuche. What exactly is the difference between these three words? What types of boxes are translated as each? Which would best ...
0
votes
2answers
168 views

Words for “grave”: tumba vs. sepultura

English has several words for burial places, many of which have specific, distinct meanings: grave tomb vault crypt mausoleum sepulcher As far as I know, Spanish has at least two words for ...
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3answers
116 views

How do you say 'mind you' in Spanish?

Ojo, este cuarto es no lugar para charlar. This room is not a place for talk. Any alternatives for it?
0
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1answer
225 views

Translation of “What was your name again?”

In English, if someone has already met someone else but later forgets their name, they might ask them something like, "I'm sorry, what was your name again?" (which is less forceful than a blunt "What ...
0
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1answer
1k views

Words for boat, ship, and other seafaring vessels

In English, we have many words to describe the different types of vessels that travel on water: boat ship yacht dinghy canoe kayak raft watercraft vessel sailboat barge catamaran lifeboat/liferaft ...
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4answers
83 views

Translating a prayer [closed]

I want to translate the following prayer from English: "Dear Lord, I pray that the Holy Spirit be with all of us, guide us in our studies and give us perseverance, help us to have patience with ...
0
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2answers
232 views

Translation of “a simple vista”

What is the most idiomatic English translation of the Spanish phrase a simple vista? Does it mean "at first glance," or does another expression fit better?
0
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1answer
75 views

Is the spanish 'YA' synonymous of 'already' and 'yet' without exceptions? [closed]

'Ya estas alli' means 'you are already there' But: 'Ya estas alli?' means 'Are you there yet? Another example: It would be wrong to say 'Ya no' when trying to mean 'Not yet; The translation of ...
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1answer
2k views

Translation of “What have you been up to lately?”

In English, when meeting someone you haven't seen for a while, you might ask, "What have you been up to lately?" What is the equivalent question in Spanish?