Determining the best possible word to express a concept among several choices.

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115 views

In what cases are “de” and “para” interchangeable?

For example in these cases "de" and "para" seem to be interchangeable: muebles de oficina / muebles para oficina juguetes de niños / juguetes para niños Are there any other cases where ...
5
votes
3answers
191 views

“Habría” or “Hubiera”

Given the following sentence: Si lo hubieran anotado, después no les hubiera (habría) costado tanto recordarlo. we see that the first use of hubieran is well used, but the second one is ...
5
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2answers
176 views

How would you build the spanish counterpart of “truthiness”?

I stumbled upon the English term Truthiness "truth" that a person claims to know intuitively "from the gut" in that it "feels right" without regard to evidence, logic, intellectual examination, or ...
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1answer
307 views

Gusto variant of the verb gustar

When I thought I finally had it figured out... I was confronted with the following phrase which obviously must mean: I liked the story of your friend. Which for me logically translates to. ...
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1answer
586 views

Words for “size”

I know there are multiple words for size in Spanish, but I'm quite fuzzy on when to use them. The two most common seem to be tamaño and talla, although in some contexts (like shoes), número seems ...
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2answers
1k views

“Vegetable”: verdura vs. vegetal

What is the difference between verduras and vegetales? In what situations can one be used as a translation for "vegetables" and the other cannot?
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2answers
209 views

How to choose between “carecer” and “faltar”?

I've always used "faltar" to mean "to lack, to be missing". But in my reading I find that "carecer" seems to mean exactly the same. When should I use the one or the other? Are there some ...
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4answers
1k views

Translating “Slow down!” (in informal contexts)

English WordReference translates "slow down" as disminuir la velocidad or desacelerar. But those sound pretty precise or technical to me. How would you translate "Slow down!" in other, more informal ...
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1answer
210 views

How do you write task lists in Spanish?

In English: Go to store. Eat dinner. ... How would this be written in Spanish?
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2answers
605 views

Difference between 'trabajar para' and 'trabajar por'

I know the difference between por and para, but I'm confused by these particular usages. I've seen both of them in various places. 'Trabajar para' seems to mean to work for, whereas 'trabajar por' ...
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2answers
3k views

¿En breve o en breves momentos?

Un presentador de televisión anunciando la casi inmediata aparición de alguna persona. Cual es modo correcto de anunciarlo: "En breve estaremos con ..." "En breves momentos estaremos con ..." "En ...
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1answer
122 views

¿Como se traduciría al español “crunch time”?

En ingles existe la palabra "crunch time": A critical period of time during which it is necessary to work hard and fast. Un periodo crítico de tiempo en el que es necesario trabajar duro y ...
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2answers
812 views

Translation of “how often” questions

What is the most idiomatic translation of "how often" into Spanish in questions like: How often do the buses stop here? How often does it rain in November? How often do you get headaches? How often ...
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5answers
495 views

Computer science, software engineer/developer, and programmer

When visiting Spanish-speaking countries, I've been told various ways to translate these terms: Computer Science (as in a university degree program) Software Engineer Software Developer Programmer ...
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6answers
295 views

Use of “¿A cómo está […]?” to ask for a price

The Diccionario panhispánico de dudas does not offer a suggestion regarding the use of cómo to ask for the price of something (item, service, or currency). I am familiar with the variants ¿a cómo ...
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2answers
130 views

“Lo peor ya ha pasado” - Why is “Lo” used?

The sentence translates to The worse has already passed. Why is lo used instead of el? When am I supposed to use one over the other?
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2answers
414 views

Can Spanish distinguish between “lonely” and “alone”?

I learned that solo in Spanish means both "alone" (the simple fact of not having anyone else around) and "lonely" (feeling sad because of being alone). Is there any way of distinguishing between these ...
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1answer
97 views

Uses of “SE” : se discutió

Can you see the difference between no. 6 and no. 7? Are there any differences in meaning? Could you please answer the questions below? 6, En el coloquio se discutió un tema interesante. 6a, ...
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3answers
416 views

Translating “I'm bad with [remembering] something”

In English, you can say: I'm horrible with names. I'm bad with faces. I'm really bad with directions. What is the most natural way in Spanish of expressing that you are bad at remembering ...
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1answer
108 views

How are «parecer», «semejante», and «similar» used to express sameness?

What is the difference between different ways of expressing similarity? I see things like, La niña parece a su hermana. Compró dos vestidos semejantes. Quiere una fiesta de cumpleaños similar a la ...
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4answers
790 views

What is the difference between “ser cierto” and “ser verdad”?

The English "to be true" can be translated to Spanish as either ser cierto or ser verdad. What is the difference between the two? When would you use one instead of the other?
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5answers
457 views

Translation of “should have”

What are the possible translations of "should have", as in "I should have told you earlier"? What are the differences between "debería (de)", "debí (de)", "debiera (de)", "debía (de)", etc.?
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5answers
237 views

“Fall in love with” (non-romantic)

English: In English, you can use the phrase "to fall in love with" with people who you aren't literally in love with. For example, when talking about children, you might say: You just fall in ...
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2answers
323 views

Spanish translation for “also”?

My understanding is the también, and asimismo can both be translated from Spanish as also. Yet there appear to be some subtle differences. What are they? For instance, does asimismo also mean ...
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5answers
4k views

Most accurate translation of “possum”

What is the most universal Spanish word to describe a possum? What regional variations exist? Does the translation refer specifically to the same animal as the English word, or does it cover a larger ...
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2answers
150 views

Spanish words for “loop”

I was recently reading a review of a Spanish-English dictionary that picked "loop" as a good example of a word with many possible translations into Spanish. I looked around and found several ...
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1answer
416 views

Names of mythical beings/creatures

Another question I asked made me realize that English has many names for mythical beings. Many of these can refer to both a historical myth or superstition as well as a more modern definition (in ...
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2answers
233 views

¿Es verdad que la palabra 'alrededor' tiene el origen árabe?

Me interesa si ¿la palabra 'alrededor' (o 'al rededor') tiene el origen árabe? ¿Sabeis otras palabras con el mismo origen?
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3answers
171 views

Adjective for fried food

Español El día de ayer estuve discutiendo con un amigo sobre como llamar a las comidas que estan fritas. ¿Llamas al pollo "frito" o "freido"? El pollo está frito El pollo está freido Para ...
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2answers
1k views

Translating “How long does it take to get from <here> to <there>?”

What is the most natural and common way to ask how much time it takes to get from one location to another? For example: How long does it take to get from Guadalajara to Mexico City? How long does it ...
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1answer
787 views

Translation: “To wish” expressing regret

How would you translate sentences like: 'I wish I had remembered that earlier.' 'I wish I had made the most of it while I still could.' There are a few ways to say I wish in Spanish, but I ...
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3answers
148 views

Difference between: “susurro” and “murmullo”

Are susurro and murmullo interchangeable?
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3answers
766 views

Translation of “Take ___ for granted”

I have heard this phrase a lot of times before in forms like: Take (anything) for granted. Don't take (anything) for granted. I'm not sure about how to translate it: Dar (algo) por ...
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2answers
222 views

¿Qué palabra se usa para describir a alguien que suda mucho?

¿Qué palabra es adecuada para describir a una persona que suda mucho?
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1answer
350 views

Spanish words for couple, few, handful, several, etc

In English, there are various words to express a small quality of something: a couple (two of something) a few (a small number, maybe around 3-5) a handful (another vague expression for a small ...
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2answers
1k views

Translating “If (request), that would be great.”

In English, I often use the formula, "If (request), that would be great." For example: If you could go to the supermarket after work, that would be great. If it's possible for you to finish ...
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2answers
382 views

Difference between “un poco de” and “un poco”

What is the difference between the use of "un poco de" and "un poco"? Why can't we say "Es un poco de moreno"(He has a little dark skin.) but "Es un poco moreno."?? Could you please provide some ...
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2answers
660 views

Translation of “to talk behind someone's back”

What is the typical Spanish translation of the English idiom "to talk behind someone's back" (as in saying something bad about another person to others instead of to them directly)?
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1answer
77 views

“la frase francesa” or “la frase en francés”?

In English, when referring to a sentence written in French, I could say "the French sentence" or "the sentence in French". English is not my first language, but I think those two variants can be used ...
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2answers
353 views

¿Cuándo usar coste o costo?

Ambas tienen un significado parecido, ¿cuándo se debe usar una o la otra? coste 2 . m. Gasto realizado para la obtención o adquisición de una cosa o de un servicio. costo 1 . m. ...
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5answers
3k views

¿Cuál es la palabra más generalmente aceptada para decir “calzado deportivo”?

Desde hace mucho tiempo he tenido esta duda, pero recientemente en esta pregunta nuevos zapatos por/para España? me surgió nuevamente. Yo siempre creí que la palabra "zapatilla" era la más ...
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2answers
925 views

¿Qué significa “jalar” en México?

¿Cuál es el significado de "jalar" para cada uno de estos ejemplos? A pesar de que esta televisión la compré apenas el año pasado, ya no jala. Ya no estés de ocioso, ¡ponte a jalar! ...
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1answer
2k views

Translation of “to catch up” (sharing recent happenings with someone you haven't seen lately)

In English, "to catch up (with each other)" can be used to describe two people that haven't seen each other in a while that are sharing recent events in their lives with each other. For example: "I ...
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3answers
4k views

Why “¿Cómo te llamas?” means “¿Cuál es tu nombre?”?

Why does "¿Cómo te llamas?" mean "¿Cuál es tu nombre?". After all, it literally means "How do you call yourself?". Yet, most of the time, you don't call yourself anything; rather, other people call ...
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votes
1answer
248 views

Translating “break” (during work)

In the US, it is common for workers to take a half-hour or hour lunch break in the middle of the day, plus two ten or fifteen minute breaks in the morning and afternoon. Spanish has many words that ...
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5answers
243 views

Distinguishing “quiz” and “test”

In American English, a "quiz" is like a "test" or "exam," but it is typically shorter (in length and duration) and less heavily weighted. In Spanish class I learned "test" was examen and "quiz" was ...
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2answers
317 views

Understanding “desde ya”

I have heard the phrase "desde ya" used to mean "in advance." Literally, it means "since already." How is it understood to mean "in advance," or is it simply an idiom with a nonsense literal meaning? ...
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1answer
190 views

Do “alborada”, “amanecer”, and “madrugada” refer to the same thing?

In English we have the two words "dawn" and "sunrise". But in Spanish there are three words, "alborada", "amanecer", and "madrugada". Do the three Spanish words refer to the same thing? Or is one ...
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3answers
256 views

“Creerle” vs “Creerla”

Tengo una duda respecto al uso de "creerle" o "creerla". He escrito algo así: -- Quiero pedirte disculpas. Recordando la noche anterior, a Martín le costó creerle. Una persona que ...
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5answers
295 views

“Tener un objeto consigo” vs “Llevar un objeto encima”?

¿Cuál de las dos construcciones es más idiomática y por qué? Tener un objeto consigo Llevar un objeto encima La pregunta es simple, pero es importante los recursos que se den para sustentar ...