About question words such as "qué", "dónde", etc, and how questions are formed.

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510 views

How to avoid the lexical redundancy in the literal Spanish translation of “to ask a question”?

In English we have different words for the verb to ask and the noun question. But in Spanish to ask is preguntar and question is pregunta. This always causes me to stumble when speaking Spanish and ...
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3answers
1k views

¿Como se contestan preguntas que llevan un “no” al inicio?

El español es mi idioma nativo, pero siempre he tenido esta duda, por ejemplo, si yo le pregunto a alguien: ¿Tienes frío? Esta persona podría contestar Sí. No. Sí, si tengo frío. No, no tengo ...
9
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2answers
722 views

Appropriate way to answer a negative yes/no question

When the question is not a negative question the response for the given question should be: Q: ¿Tienes carro? "Sí, tengo." for a positive answer or "No tengo." for a negative one. No, what if ...
8
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2answers
458 views

What makes a question in Spanish rhetorical?

In German, the placement or usage of single words shifts the meaning of a rhetorical question, in English, additionally distinct marker phrases are common for this purpose. Are there specific ...
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2answers
941 views

Translation of “how often” questions

What is the most idiomatic translation of "how often" into Spanish in questions like: How often do the buses stop here? How often does it rain in November? How often do you get headaches? How often ...
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6answers
310 views

Use of “¿A cómo está […]?” to ask for a price

The Diccionario panhispánico de dudas does not offer a suggestion regarding the use of cómo to ask for the price of something (item, service, or currency). I am familiar with the variants ¿a cómo ...
5
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1answer
81 views

How to say 'Is climate change making them worse?', with 'them' referring to floods

I am trying to say 'is climate change making them worse?' as a question, with 'them' referring to 'floods'. The full sentence is meant to be a title or slogan for something, like 'Floods in Ecuador; ...
4
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1answer
218 views

Word order of questions

After reading: ¿Qué hace tu padre? ¿Cuándo trabaja tu hermana? I would think: ¿Por qué es vendedora tu madre? is the appropriate word order but it turns out to be ¿Por qué es tu madre ...
4
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3answers
863 views

Proper response to ¿Qué onda?

In parts of the Spanish-speaking world, "¿Qué onda?" is used to ask something along the lines of "What's up?". What are the possible responses to this question? Should it be answered with a bien/mal, ...
4
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2answers
2k views

Translating “How long does it take to get from <here> to <there>?”

What is the most natural and common way to ask how much time it takes to get from one location to another? For example: How long does it take to get from Guadalajara to Mexico City? How long does it ...
4
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1answer
156 views

Why is there an interrogative pronoun in this sentence which is not a question?

I've seen the use of interrogative pronouns in ordinary statements, not just questions. For example, from the book "Harry Potter y la piedra filosofal": "Los Dursley se estremecían al pensar qué ...
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2answers
344 views

Translation of “Who are you writing to”

I've seen the question Who are you writing to? translated in two ways: ¿A quién escribes? and ¿Quién le escribes? The first sentence seems to translate more as To whom do you write?, ...
3
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1answer
368 views

“Ir a” versus future tense when asking a question

I've read that one should use "ir a" when time of completion is certain. If the time is uncertain, one should use the future tense. This choice is not so clear-cut when asking a question. Take for ...
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1answer
93 views

Response when you don't understand what's said before ¿…, verdad?

What are the possible responses to a sentence you don't hear or understand that ends in ¿verdad? For example: Mañana vas a ..., ¿verdad? In English you could say something like "Isn't what ...
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1answer
61 views

Inference/guess about an event in the past

Objective Understand/clarify how to express inference/guess on an event that happened in the past. Question To say "Who built Stonehenge (and why)?" in Spanish seems to be: Quien construirían ...
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1answer
4k views

Translation of “What have you been up to lately?”

In English, when meeting someone you haven't seen for a while, you might ask, "What have you been up to lately?" What is the equivalent question in Spanish?