The tag has no wiki summary.

learn more… | top users | synonyms (1)

2
votes
1answer
63 views

Name Suffixes “Sr” (Senior) and “Jr” (Junior) in Spanish

What are the equivalent personal name suffixes in Spanish? Sr / Senior Jr / Junior Some examples would be: Mr. John Doe, Sr. Mr. John Doe, Jr.
7
votes
1answer
368 views

Why is “Santiago” the equivalent of “James”?

Most Spanish names are quite similar to the equivalent in English, such as: Juan = John Pedro = Peter Maria = Mary etc. But what's up with: Santiago = James ? What's the connection? How do the ...
1
vote
2answers
229 views

llamar with names

Me llamo Mary. So the common way to say this in English is "My name is Mary", but the literal translation is more like: I call myself Mary. So I wonder, if we take this in English: Call ...
1
vote
1answer
88 views

Pronouncing a person's name according to our mood

I have heard that in spanish, when people usually call each other by their names, they change the names according to their mood. For example, a person named Carlos can be referred to as Carlitos or ...
5
votes
3answers
190 views

Coffee with legs / The cafe with legs

So there's an infamous coffee shop in Santiago which goes by the name Café con piernas. Everywhere I've seen, including the Wikipedia article linked above, it's translated as "coffee with legs". ...
1
vote
2answers
1k views

Equivalent of Joe in spanish? [closed]

I want to remember what a friend's name was I just met. It's on the tip of my tongue, and I keep wanting to say Yohio or Yojo. It was not Jose. I don't remember. He went by Joe as well. I remember it ...
0
votes
1answer
226 views

Translation of “What was your name again?”

In English, if someone has already met someone else but later forgets their name, they might ask them something like, "I'm sorry, what was your name again?" (which is less forceful than a blunt "What ...
1
vote
2answers
690 views

Translating “They don't call me … for nothing.”

In English, there is a phrase "They don't call me ... for nothing." (showing that some nickname someone has has been confirmed by something they just did or are about to do). Is there any equivalent ...
2
votes
2answers
1k views

Is there a rule for forming the diminutive of names?

In Spanish, the diminutive form of names can be used to affectionately refer to someone. Are there any rules for how to derive the diminutive form of names (of people, not places), or is it different ...
5
votes
2answers
163 views

Counterpart of “John Doe, Joe Public”?

In English these names are used as a substitute for the average guy. Or as a specimen when filling out a passport form. What names/expressions are used in Spanish for this purpose?