2
votes
6answers
238 views

“Bad” words in good phrases - how socially acceptable are they

I've heard two expressions which at first I thought were kind of offensive, because of the specific words in them: Mucha mierda! de puta madre It turns out both are actually nice things to ...
1
vote
4answers
122 views

Translation of “can”

I know can is poder in Spanish. But generally it would indicate the ability to do something rather than the permission. You cannot drink. No puedo beber. The above sentence could imply: 1) ...
0
votes
2answers
100 views

“A menudo” vs “frecuentemente”

Dictionary says both mean often. Which one is a better way to say often in Spanish in day to day conversations? If there are regional variations, I would like to know what Mexicans prefer.
5
votes
3answers
327 views

Plátano and banana, geographical differences?

I don't really speak Spanish, but I do know a few words and phrases here and there, and enjoy furthering what little knowledge I have. So, today I saw, in a Swedish newspaper, a reference to plantains ...
3
votes
3answers
197 views

¿Es una grosería decir “chíngalo”?

¿Quieres ver la televisión? ¡Chíngalo! Vamos al cine. ¿Sería una ofensa decir "chíngalo" en donde se hable español?
1
vote
1answer
116 views

The difference between simple and sencilla/o

This words confuse me. When are simple and sencilla used? They both mean ' simple' but are they used in certain contexts? Tengo un casa sencilla/ simple junto al río. I wonder if i can use both in ...
7
votes
1answer
147 views

“Haber de” y futuridad

La entrada de "haber" en lo "Diccionario panhispánico de dudas" incluye este trozo: a) haber de + infinitivo. En el español general, esta perífrasis denota obligación, conveniencia o necesidad ...
5
votes
5answers
1k views

What does “apañao” mean?

¿Qué significa "apañao"? Aparentemente se usa exclusivamente en la región de Andalucía. Estaba hablando con alguien y dijo esa palabra pero no la pudo traducir. ¿Alguien sabe su significado y uso? ...
6
votes
2answers
201 views

Regional differences between escuchar and oír

In school I learned that escuchar was for the English "to listen to" and oír was "to hear." In Central America, however, I frequently heard escuchar being used for "to hear" (e.g. No te escucho ...
2
votes
3answers
4k views

Describing the common cold or flu in Spanish

In English, when talking about common viruses people often get, there are generally two categories: a cold is generally more mild and can come with runny nose, sneezing, coughing, sore throat, etc. ...
20
votes
6answers
48k views

What's the difference between “vamos” and “vámonos”?

Español Cuando estaba estudiando Español, aprendí que "let's go" es "vamos," pero cuando fui a México, lo único que oído estaba "vámonos." Pregunté a una persona bilingüe allá, pero ella no supe la ...
10
votes
6answers
598 views

How big are the regional differences in the Spanish spoken in different countries?

As a non-native speaker, I have no more difficulty conversing with a Mexican than a Spaniard or Venezuelan or Colombian or vice versa. I realize there are regional variations and differences in ...
5
votes
4answers
131 views

Usage of the word acullá

WordReference translates acullá as "yonder." Is this a word that was only used in the past, or is it still used in modern Spanish today? If so, what regions does it appear in and how is it used?
4
votes
7answers
3k views

Meaning and connotations of “gringo”

In the US, "gringo" is usually understood as a disparaging reference to a foreigner (see the Merriam-Webster definition). What exactly does gringo mean in Spanish? Is it neutral, or does it have ...
6
votes
5answers
1k views

Definition of escuela and colegio

Spanish has two generic words for school: escuela and colegio. I have heard different explanations for what phases of schooling each word refers to. For example, I've been told that colegio refers ...
8
votes
3answers
517 views

Use of “Que” in “Que todo te vaya bien”

Que todo te vaya bien. Que nos reunamos a las 6. I've seen, and used, que in this form - it's as if the verb has been dropped, say, espero. What is the origin of this usage? Is it ...
6
votes
3answers
307 views

Regional use of “genial”

What parts of the Spanish-speaking world regularly use the word genial? Is it only encountered in Spain, or is it common in other regions as well? Edit: It seems like it's more widespread than I ...
28
votes
9answers
2k views

Any difference between aquí and acá

I've been taught that aquí and acá are completely interchangable. From personal observation, acá seems to be used more often than aquí in the context of "I live down this road." Example: Vivo ...
14
votes
9answers
4k views

'vos' vs 'tú' usage by country

I lived for a while in Bolivia, and I noticed some people used "vos" instead of "tú" as the second person familiar singular pronoun. Which countries use "vos" instead of "tú", and are there any that ...