Uso de los adjetivos y su propiedades. Use of adjetives and its properties.

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¿Por qué mis amigas dicen “listo” en vez de “lista” cuando están listas para ir?

He tenido la impresión de que debo de usar "lista" cuando me refiero a una mujer. Por ejemplo: Ella está lista para ir. Pero es común oír a mis amigas decir solo listo en este contexto. ¿Por ...
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Why “fiestas de árboles” and not “árboles de fiestas”?

I encountered the expression "fiestas de árboles" in a song by a Chilean singer whose lyrics are: Tus ojos son fiestas de árboles, son mi ventana. Son estrellas que guían mi caravana. Google ...
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Translating “wise” (not referring to a person, e.g. “wise decision”)

As I understand it, wise is normally translated as sabio when referring to a person. What about when not referring to a person? For example: I don't think that would be a very wise decision. ...
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Translation of “Great!”

In English, the interjection "Great!" can be used to respond to almost any statement. In Spanish, I've heard a few similar interjections: ¡Qué bien! ¡Qué bueno! ¡Está bien! ¡Está bueno! I've ...
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shy: tímido vs. reservado vs. vergonzoso vs. penoso

In many parts of the Spanish-speaking world, describing a person who is "shy" can be done with at least four different words: tímido reservado vergonzoso penoso What is the difference between ...
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Does pelón/pelona mean bald or hairy?

I have heard pelón (or the feminine pelona) used to both refer to someone who has no hair and someone who has a lot of hair. Is there any way of distinguishing whether pelón means bald or hairy, or is ...
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454 views

Efficient: eficiente vs. eficaz

The English "efficient" can be translated as either eficiente or eficaz in Spanish. What is the difference between these two translations? In what situations can each be used?
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What adjective ending to use with “algo masculino y/o algo femenino”

When you're using y/o with options of different genders, what's the correct ending to use for an adjective that modifies both? Specifically, I was writing: Si entras un usuario y/o contraseña ...
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judging something as poor (objectively) , bad (emotionally)

In GLU we had a question on difference between schlimm-schlecht (bad-poor). My rule of thumb was: use bad if something feels bad, affects you emotionally in a negative sense use poor to judge ...
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adjectives for “same thing” vs. “same kind of thing”

In German, das gleiche refers to We both read the same (das gleiche) book (everyone has its own, but they look exactly the same) while das selbe refers to We both read the same book (...
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Are there other “feminine only” adjectives in Spanish besides “embarazada”?

In most if not all Spanish dictionaries I've checked, embarazada is only ever listed in its feminine form unlike all other adjectives I can think of. Is this semantic because it's considered that ...
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Suffixes used to transform an adjective into a noun [closed]

Spanish has, to my knowledge, more possible suffixes than for example English or German. Many adjectives can be transformed into nouns by adding -ness, -ism, -ity in English, or -keit, -heit, -ismus ...