4
votes
1answer
774 views

¿Cuál es el gentilicio de las personas de Alaska?

¿Cuál es el gentilicio correcto para hacer referencia a las personas que viven en Alaska?
1
vote
2answers
135 views

Translating “wise” (not referring to a person, e.g. “wise decision”)

As I understand it, wise is normally translated as sabio when referring to a person. What about when not referring to a person? For example: I don't think that would be a very wise decision. ...
5
votes
4answers
3k views

Translation of mild, medium, and hot (food spiciness)

In English, salsa, hot sauce, or other spicy foods are often classified as either mild (not very spicy), medium (moderately spicy), or hot (very spicy). Does Spanish have similar adjectives to ...
3
votes
1answer
412 views

shy: tímido vs. reservado vs. vergonzoso vs. penoso

In many parts of the Spanish-speaking world, describing a person who is "shy" can be done with at least four different words: tímido reservado vergonzoso penoso What is the difference between ...
1
vote
1answer
246 views

Efficient: eficiente vs. eficaz

The English "efficient" can be translated as either eficiente or eficaz in Spanish. What is the difference between these two translations? In what situations can each be used?
3
votes
2answers
714 views

Algún to represent an indefinite quantity?

I'm using the textbook Fuentes: Conversación y gramática, and in it it states: "To talk about indefinite quantity in affirmitive sentences and questions, use the following adjectives and pronouns." ...
13
votes
4answers
63k views

Bonita, linda, hermosa, bella, and guapa: what's the difference?

I've seen all of these used to mean 'pretty', although 'hermosa' seems to mean beautiful and 'guapa' seems to mean handsome. Are there any subtle differences them? For instance, in English being ...
2
votes
1answer
221 views

Are there other “feminine only” adjectives in Spanish besides “embarazada”?

In most if not all Spanish dictionaries I've checked, embarazada is only ever listed in its feminine form unlike all other adjectives I can think of. Is this semantic because it's considered that ...
2
votes
0answers
534 views

Suffixes used to transform an adjective into a noun [closed]

Spanish has, to my knowledge, more possible suffixes than for example English or German. Many adjectives can be transformed into nouns by adding -ness, -ism, -ity in English, or -keit, -heit, -ismus ...