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Do these two words have any common root? I looked up in the RAE, and didn't find there any connection between these words. According to the RAE, cuchillo comes from Latin "cultellus", and cuchara comes from verb "cuchar".

So it looks like there are no real connections there, maybe it's only this, but I still see that both words share the common part "cuch". And it seems to me that cuchillo also comes from cuchar, with just adding the suffix -illo. So how come that the Latin word cultellus transforms itself from knife to something spoon-like?

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IS there such a connection?? –  Joze Dec 11 '11 at 16:30
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I think it really is just a nice coincidence. –  hippietrail Dec 11 '11 at 17:27
    
@hippietrail maybe, but in this case, when these two words are commonly used together in daily life. I want to believe that they are somehow connected to each other. But I understand that I can be terribly wrong here. –  igor milla Dec 11 '11 at 18:04
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I would say the roots are different. I think it is cuchill (cuchillo, cuchillazo,...) and cuchar (cucharilla, cuchara, cucharazo) so they don't have the same root. –  Juanillo Dec 11 '11 at 20:46
    
@Juanillo that's a very good point, you can post it as an answer –  igor milla Dec 11 '11 at 22:26

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I would say the roots are different. I think it is cuchill (cuchillo, cuchillazo,...) and cuchar (cucharilla, cuchara, cucharazo) so they don't have the same root.

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Juanillo, just for clarify, you should also answer the OP's specific yes/no question: is there a connection or not? –  hippietrail Dec 12 '11 at 8:13
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What's your reason for analysing cuchillo as coming from a stem cuchill- rather than a diminutive of ?cucho? –  Peter Taylor Dec 13 '11 at 11:34
    
@Peter Taylor It's the first time I see that word, but looking at RAE dictionary the definitions don't have anything to do with a knife (it means crooked, cat...). It would be as if you compare in English "tun", "tune" and "tunnel"... they don't have a coomon context meaning, while "cuchillo, "cuchillada", "cuchillero"... does –  Juanillo Dec 16 '11 at 14:38

If you follow through another step with the DRAE you'll find that it indicates the etymology of cuchar as the Latin word cochleāre; according to latin-dictionary.org this means spoon and was originally a spoon for extracting snails from their shells; snail being cochlea. So actually cuchillo has come further in form from its Latin root (cultell- to cuchill- vs cochle- to cuch-).

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