Take the 2-minute tour ×
Spanish Language Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for students, teachers, and linguists wanting to discuss the finer points of the Spanish language. It's 100% free, no registration required.

What does this construction mean and what are it's limits? Why isn't it Taqueria de la Michoacana? Is this a common way of naming things?

share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

More or less as MikeWats mentioned, stores are often named by store type (zapatería, bar, cafetería, taquería, etc) and then given a juxtaposed name (that is, placed without a preposition). It's common anywhere not just in Mexico but all over the Spanish-speaking world, although less so with newer more commercial/(inter)national places that go with a single brand name.

share|improve this answer

It is just the name of the taquería

  • The United Fruit Company is a company name.
  • La Michoacana in this case is the name too. Since Spanish uses more articles than English, stores names have one most of the times.
share|improve this answer

In "La Michoacana" the article "La" is telling you that the place is bound to "Michoacan" state, being "Michoacana" treated like you would treat a nationality.

It's like "The American Shop", you're saying that the shop is bound to America or has something to do with it.

share|improve this answer

The full name is "La Michoacana"

For instance , could be :

Ferretería Don Pepe
Taqueria Los Hermanos
Neveria La Michoacana --> Famous in Mexico

In México is a common way for naming stores , in this case it´s named for the State of Michoacan.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 I've seen "Neveria/Paleteria La Michoacana" places in multiple Mexican states... –  DarkAjax Jul 14 at 18:53

It could be but it is just written another way.

Simply put its a simple adjective followed by a proper noun.

You'd say the same in English as:

  • Record Store "The Beetles"

Or something similar along those lines.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.