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In English, we often used the phrase looking forward to when we are excited about something in the future:

I'm looking forward to seeing you next week!

I'm really looking forward to finals being over.

He's looking forward to the day when he can finally retire.

What is the best way to translate this sentiment in Spanish?

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One of my favorite expressions in English, for no good reason :) –  vemv Apr 18 '12 at 0:49
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3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted
  • I'm looking forward to seeing you next week!
  • Espero verte la semana entrante (or la semana próxima) (esperar here means desire, not wait)

Also:

  • Ojalá nos veamos la semana próxima (ojalá ... from the Arabic oj Aláh "May God wish"

Also for example (but not exactly)

-Me gustaría verte la semana próxima

For the other two sentences the Spanish expressions are different:

  • He's looking forward to the day when he can finally retire.
  • Él espera (ansiosamente) su retiro

  • I'm really looking forward to finals being over.

  • No veo el momento en que terminen los finales.
  • No veo la hora en que terminen los finales
  • Espero (aniosamente) que terminen los finales
  • Ya no veo la hora en que terminen los finales
  • Estoy deseando que terminen los finales
  • Etc. :)
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As razpeitia mentions in his answer, does "espero ..." convey that you are excited about something coming up in the future, or just that you hope/wish/desire it will happen? –  jrdioko Nov 23 '11 at 6:39
    
"Hope/with/desire". It could mean just hope ("Espero que no llueva") or security about something ("Espero que llegue pronto"). It depends a lot on context. –  rsuarez Nov 23 '11 at 9:00
    
@jrd Yep. It depends. "Espero que me pagues pronto"! –  belisarius Nov 23 '11 at 14:22
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+1 Simply "espero", perhaps adding a reforcing adverb or locution ("sinceramente", "verdaderamente", "de verdad") is in general right. Also "No veo la hora de que..." is quite used here (Argentina), but it often suggests exhaustion rather than excitement ("No veo la hora de que empiecen las vacaciones"). –  leonbloy Nov 23 '11 at 15:15
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I would use one expression to translate another expression and not just translated it literally.

I'm looking forward to seeing you next week!
¡Ya quiero verte la siguiente semana!

I'm really looking forward to finals being over.
¡Ya quiero que los finales terminen!

He's looking forward to the day when he can finally retire.
El ya quiere que llege el dia cuando finalmente se pueda retirar.

I would also use "espero" but this denotes lack of excitement.

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"Ya quiero", as in the three examples, sounds rather strange to me (from Argentina). –  leonbloy Nov 23 '11 at 15:09
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Yeap, if you're from Argentina or Spain It'll sound strange. But sounds perfectly normal in Mexico and others countries. –  razpeitia Nov 23 '11 at 15:59
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Dropping ya from the three examples would make them sound more natural. The use of quiero in the first example sounds too intimate, at least from a Colombian perspective. You could tell a business partner I'm look forward to seeing you next week! whereas ¡Ya quiero verte la siguiente semana! sounds like something you would say to someone to whom you are emotionally attached. Espero would be a better choice for the first example. –  Jaime Soto Nov 23 '11 at 23:00
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En España, es tener ganas de X.

Ejemplo:

Tengo ganas de verte, la próxima semana

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