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In Spanish class, I remember learning that "stress" (as in what someone who is coming up on a deadline feels) isn't commonly spoken of in Spanish-speaking countries for cultural reasons, but it can be translated by the "Spanglish" estrés. Looking up "stress" in WordReference shows it can be translated estrés, tensión, or presión, and looking in the RAE shows estrés is actually an accepted word with that meaning.

What is the most common way of saying "stress" in Spanish-speaking countries? And how would other common expressions involving stress be translated, like:

  • This is a very stressful job.
  • I've been really stressed out lately.
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2 Answers 2

up vote 11 down vote accepted

I (Spaniard guy) would say:

  • This is a very stressful job - Éste es un trabajo muy estresante.
  • I've been really stressed out lately. - He estado muy estresado últimamente.

Sample usage (veridical): I've got my mom fed up with my "¡Ay!, ¡No me estreses!" every time she tells me to clean my room.

Some other approaches may include:

  • Es un trabajo con mucha presión (It's job with a lot of pressure)
  • Trabajo bien bajo presión (I work well under pressure... Erm... Unless an English speaking person understands that I function properly at great depths in the ocean, where the water pressure is high)
  • Sufro mucha presión en el trabajo (I'm very pressured at work) although if someone told me this, I would probably think that the pressure comes from an element non exactly job-related, but more like a nasty boss or something... (this is a very, very subjective detail, though)
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4  
"pesado" (heavy) is commonly used in my experience to explain "stressful" situations. As in Tuve un día muy pesado. or Mi trabajo es muy pesado. All variations on the same theme, though. –  Flimzy Mar 29 '12 at 23:51

the most accurate term for that is, as Borrajax has said, estresante, but you can also use other terms like agobiante (from agobio)

As RAE says:

agobio.

  1. m. Acción y efecto de agobiar.
  2. m. Sofocación, angustia.

So you can translate those sentences as:

Este trabajo es muy agobiante

Hoy estoy muy agobiado

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