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  • What's the meaning of the popular mexican expression "Te (la) bañaste", "Se (la) bañó"?.

  • What's the origin?

Examples:

1.

A: El profesor de matemáticas nos encargó, el día de hoy, resolver cien problemas algebraicos para mañana.

B: ¡Ah se la bañó! Son muchos.

2.

A: Olvidé que ayer era el cumpleaños de mi mamá.

B: Te la bañaste. ¿Como se te pudo olvidar algo así?

3.

A: Estabamos caminando a lado de la alberca y aventé a mi hermano a ella.

B: Te bañaste. Que malo eres.

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+1 First time I hear the term. Question: On the first example, should it be ¡Ah, se la baño! or ¡Ah, se la bañó! (past)? –  Icarus Jan 19 '12 at 15:39
    
@Icarus Thank you. Adding the accent. –  Alfredo Osorio Jan 19 '12 at 15:51
    
I had never heard it either –  MikMik Jan 19 '12 at 15:57
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3 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

In the context where I live this expression is used to denote a type some type of excess.

A: El profesor de matemáticas nos encargó, el día de hoy, resolver cien problemas algebraicos para mañana.

B: ¡Ah se la baño! Son muchos.

In the example above it means that the professor let his students a lot of work, I don't think you can translate (even in slang) to English, in order to denote a similar meaning you would use expressions such as:

I can't believe it.
Oh my God!

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+1 In Spain we would say "pasarse" instead of bañarse as "Ah, ¡cómo se pasa!" or "¡ah, se ha pasado cien pueblos!" Though "dar un baño a alguien" means to beat somebody without problems. –  Javi Jan 19 '12 at 15:59
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I think you know the meaning now. But the origin turns out being, to me, an rhythmic euphemism to for the most common and vulgar expression te la mamaste, which has the same meaning. Te la mamaste and te la bañaste have the same syllable at the end, same rhythmic, same vowels. If you hear a twangy version of both expressions, you cannot tell which is which.

Another example illustrating this phenomenon would be

¡Pepe, no manches, otra vez llegaste borracho!

The "no manches" stands actually for a "no mames", which I think you are familiar with.

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It is used to denote excess or exaggeration. Here is how I would translate it:

  • A: El profesor de matemáticas nos encargó, el día de hoy, resolver cien problemas algebraicos para mañana.
  • B: ¡Ah se la baño! Son muchos.
  • A: The math teacher gave us, just today, 100 algebra problems to solve by tomorrow.
  • B: Wow, he/she swamped you. That's a lot.
  • A: Olvidé que ayer era el cumpleaños de mi mamá.
  • B: Te la bañaste. ¿Como se te pudo olvidar algo así?
  • A: I forgot that yesterday was my Mom's birthday.
  • B: You really blew it. How could you forget something like that?
  • A: Estabamos caminando a lado de la alberca y aventé a mi hermano a ella.
  • B: Te bañaste. Que malo eres.
  • A: We were walking a long the edge of the pool and I shoved my brother in.
  • B: You went to far. You're terrible.

So, while there is not a single expression in English that covers all the ways that it is used in Mexico, you can translate it using any number of regional colloquial phrases that express excess. The logic of the phrase is like the English phrase of bathing your food with a sauce. Think of the action of submersing something in a tub of water, it was more than what was needed to clean it. Please note that in most of the other Spanish-speaking countries of the Americas, it is either not used or it only expresses negative excess.

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